2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165247
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
NEUTROPENIC DIET WITH LEUKEMIA PATIENTS
Author(s):
Gardner, Alison
Author Details:
Alison Gardner, PHD RN, CNS, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: agardner@mdanderson.org
Abstract:
Neutropenia continues to be a significant problem for leukemia patients receiving chemotherapy. Various precautions have been instituted once patients become neutropenic. One of these, the neutropenic diet has been very controversial with varying practices among institutions and physicians. The practice started about 30 years ago when Pseudomonas was cultured from tomatoes. There have been various surveys regarding hospitals that use the neutropenic diet, but there has not been a randomized clinical trials to evaluate infection rates based on the neutropenic diet versus a diet including fresh fruits and vegetables. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the infection and death rate of leukemia patients who eat a regular diet including raw fruits and vegetables compared with patients who eat a neutropenic diet which excludes raw fruits and vegetables. The inclusion criteria includes newly diagnosed patients with acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome who are receiving frontline chemotherapy in the protective environment (PE). Exclusion criteria includes patients with a pneumonia or bacteremia on admission and those who refuse to eat raw fruits or vegetables. Patients were randomized according to an ERM (early risk mortality) score and were asked to keep a diary of their food intake. Questionnaires were done weekly to document fever, bacteremia or pneumonia. The study will be conducted from the time the patient initiates chemotherapy until they are discharged from the hospital or their absolute neutrophil count is over 1000. The statistical design is a posterior and predictive probability computation to evaluate for interim monitoring. A Chi-Square was used to compare the infection and death rates between the two treatment arms. Presently 150 patients have been enrolled on the study. The infection rate in the raw fruit and vegetable group is 29% with 16 bacteremia and 2 pneumonia. The infection rate in the neutropenic diet group is 32% with 9 bacteremia and 12 pneumonia. There was one death in the neutropenic group. Infection rates in both groups are similar raising the question of the necessity of the neutropenic diet.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNEUTROPENIC DIET WITH LEUKEMIA PATIENTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Alisonen_US
dc.author.detailsAlison Gardner, PHD RN, CNS, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: agardner@mdanderson.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165247-
dc.description.abstractNeutropenia continues to be a significant problem for leukemia patients receiving chemotherapy. Various precautions have been instituted once patients become neutropenic. One of these, the neutropenic diet has been very controversial with varying practices among institutions and physicians. The practice started about 30 years ago when Pseudomonas was cultured from tomatoes. There have been various surveys regarding hospitals that use the neutropenic diet, but there has not been a randomized clinical trials to evaluate infection rates based on the neutropenic diet versus a diet including fresh fruits and vegetables. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the infection and death rate of leukemia patients who eat a regular diet including raw fruits and vegetables compared with patients who eat a neutropenic diet which excludes raw fruits and vegetables. The inclusion criteria includes newly diagnosed patients with acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome who are receiving frontline chemotherapy in the protective environment (PE). Exclusion criteria includes patients with a pneumonia or bacteremia on admission and those who refuse to eat raw fruits or vegetables. Patients were randomized according to an ERM (early risk mortality) score and were asked to keep a diary of their food intake. Questionnaires were done weekly to document fever, bacteremia or pneumonia. The study will be conducted from the time the patient initiates chemotherapy until they are discharged from the hospital or their absolute neutrophil count is over 1000. The statistical design is a posterior and predictive probability computation to evaluate for interim monitoring. A Chi-Square was used to compare the infection and death rates between the two treatment arms. Presently 150 patients have been enrolled on the study. The infection rate in the raw fruit and vegetable group is 29% with 16 bacteremia and 2 pneumonia. The infection rate in the neutropenic diet group is 32% with 9 bacteremia and 12 pneumonia. There was one death in the neutropenic group. Infection rates in both groups are similar raising the question of the necessity of the neutropenic diet.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:07Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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