A PILOT STUDY TO DETERMINE NUTRITIONAL NEEDS OF AMBULATORY CHEMOTHERAPY PATIENTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165251
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A PILOT STUDY TO DETERMINE NUTRITIONAL NEEDS OF AMBULATORY CHEMOTHERAPY PATIENTS
Author(s):
Goldstein, Louise
Author Details:
Louise Goldstein, RN OCN CHPN, Nursing Program Coordinator, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: golds008@mc.duke.edu
Abstract:
Research has demonstrated a connection between nutrition and health. People with cancer, undergoing treatment, experience weight loss and poor nutritional status, which can have a detrimental effect on the response to cancer treatment and patientsÆ quality of life. The outpatient oncology infusion clinic currently does not receive any nutritional support from a dietitian. The RN is the only resource for nutritional guidance. The purpose of this project was to determine how many patients receiving chemotherapy or combination therapy needed to be evaluated and supported by a dietitian. The goal was to demonstrate the need for a paid position for a dietitian in this outpatient treatment area. The Scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG- SGA) was selected as the patient assessment tool. This tool was chosen because it has multiple levels of nutritional triage recommendations and established reliability and validity. A demographic tool was used to collect data on type of cancer, if receiving single or combination therapies, what agents were being used, and the frequency of treatments. Nurses used the PG-SGA and demographic tool to collect information on a random sample of 90 patients. The assessment tools were completed and entered into an Access database. Of the 90 patients surveyed, it was determined that 72% of those patient receiving chemotherapy alone and 93% of patients receiving combination therapy required dietitian evaluation and support based on the triage guidelines. Of the cancer disease sites reviewed, breast, gastrointestinal, head & neck and gynecological cancers predominantly required dietitian intervention. Based on the above information, presentations have been made at both the department and service line level stressing the need for nutritional support for this vulnerable population. The data has also been shared with the Director of Nutrition Services for the hospital, who is benchmarking with other programs. The need for this new position has been established and accepted. The position is currently being worked into the next fiscal budget. This is an example of how nurses can use clinical data to advocate for improved patient care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA PILOT STUDY TO DETERMINE NUTRITIONAL NEEDS OF AMBULATORY CHEMOTHERAPY PATIENTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, Louiseen_US
dc.author.detailsLouise Goldstein, RN OCN CHPN, Nursing Program Coordinator, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: golds008@mc.duke.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165251-
dc.description.abstractResearch has demonstrated a connection between nutrition and health. People with cancer, undergoing treatment, experience weight loss and poor nutritional status, which can have a detrimental effect on the response to cancer treatment and patientsÆ quality of life. The outpatient oncology infusion clinic currently does not receive any nutritional support from a dietitian. The RN is the only resource for nutritional guidance. The purpose of this project was to determine how many patients receiving chemotherapy or combination therapy needed to be evaluated and supported by a dietitian. The goal was to demonstrate the need for a paid position for a dietitian in this outpatient treatment area. The Scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG- SGA) was selected as the patient assessment tool. This tool was chosen because it has multiple levels of nutritional triage recommendations and established reliability and validity. A demographic tool was used to collect data on type of cancer, if receiving single or combination therapies, what agents were being used, and the frequency of treatments. Nurses used the PG-SGA and demographic tool to collect information on a random sample of 90 patients. The assessment tools were completed and entered into an Access database. Of the 90 patients surveyed, it was determined that 72% of those patient receiving chemotherapy alone and 93% of patients receiving combination therapy required dietitian evaluation and support based on the triage guidelines. Of the cancer disease sites reviewed, breast, gastrointestinal, head & neck and gynecological cancers predominantly required dietitian intervention. Based on the above information, presentations have been made at both the department and service line level stressing the need for nutritional support for this vulnerable population. The data has also been shared with the Director of Nutrition Services for the hospital, who is benchmarking with other programs. The need for this new position has been established and accepted. The position is currently being worked into the next fiscal budget. This is an example of how nurses can use clinical data to advocate for improved patient care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:12Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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