2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165253
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PREPARING ONCOLOGY NURSES FOR CONTEMPORARY SURVIVORSHIP CARE
Author(s):
Grant, Marcia; Ferrell, Betty; Bhatia, Smita; Economou, Denice
Author Details:
Marcia Grant, RN DNSC FAAN, Director and Research Scientist, City of Hope National Medical Center, Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, California, USA, email: mgrant@coh.org; Betty Ferrell, PhD, FAAN; Smita Bhatia, MD; Denice Economou, RN, MN
Abstract:
Cancer survivors face multiple lifetime risks related to cancer and its treatment. In 2006 the Institute of Medicine report identified lack of knowledge of cancer late effects as one major barrier health care providers face in providing follow-up care to the 10 million cancer survivors. The purpose of this NCI-funded study is to develop a health professional curriculum, recruit participants, conduct an educational program and evaluate and follow participantsÆ goal achievement over time. The framework is composed of three concepts: institutional change, adult education principles, and the City of Hope Quality Life Model (COH-QOL). Multiple teaching strategies include: competitive application process, administrative support, goal-based education, participative learning, post-course networking and follow-up. Four annual courses include pre-course and post-course (6, 12, & 18 month) evaluation data. Two-person interdisciplinary teams from cancer centers apply with at least one member being a nurse, physician, or administrator. Course content, organized around the COH- QOL domains: Physical, Psychological, Social and Spiritual, is delivered by expert faculty. Team selection includes stated interests, three projected goals and letters of commitment from administrators. ParticipantsÆ goals are evaluated at 6, 12, & 18 months for institutional changes in survivorship activities. The first program was held July 13-15, 2006 for 53 teams (106 participants); 75% of the teams had one or more oncology nurses. The institutional barriers identified pre-course were lack of survivorship knowledge (94%), financial constraints (61%), staff philosophy that excluded survivorship (15%) and lack of administrative support (6%). Course evaluations revealed a rating of quality of content at 4.6 on a scale of 1-5 (5=best) The 159 institutional goals used in following participantsÆ post program progress were divided into major categories: educational endeavors; changes in organizational structure; development of new clinical processes; specific survivorship activities; and research on survivorship. First 6 month follow up data will be presented and include the characteristics of institutional barriers and the experience of goal implementation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: National Cancer Institute. 1-R25-CA 107109-01-A1-Survivorship for Quality Cancer Care.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePREPARING ONCOLOGY NURSES FOR CONTEMPORARY SURVIVORSHIP CAREen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Marciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFerrell, Bettyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBhatia, Smitaen_US
dc.contributor.authorEconomou, Deniceen_US
dc.author.detailsMarcia Grant, RN DNSC FAAN, Director and Research Scientist, City of Hope National Medical Center, Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, California, USA, email: mgrant@coh.org; Betty Ferrell, PhD, FAAN; Smita Bhatia, MD; Denice Economou, RN, MNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165253-
dc.description.abstractCancer survivors face multiple lifetime risks related to cancer and its treatment. In 2006 the Institute of Medicine report identified lack of knowledge of cancer late effects as one major barrier health care providers face in providing follow-up care to the 10 million cancer survivors. The purpose of this NCI-funded study is to develop a health professional curriculum, recruit participants, conduct an educational program and evaluate and follow participantsÆ goal achievement over time. The framework is composed of three concepts: institutional change, adult education principles, and the City of Hope Quality Life Model (COH-QOL). Multiple teaching strategies include: competitive application process, administrative support, goal-based education, participative learning, post-course networking and follow-up. Four annual courses include pre-course and post-course (6, 12, & 18 month) evaluation data. Two-person interdisciplinary teams from cancer centers apply with at least one member being a nurse, physician, or administrator. Course content, organized around the COH- QOL domains: Physical, Psychological, Social and Spiritual, is delivered by expert faculty. Team selection includes stated interests, three projected goals and letters of commitment from administrators. ParticipantsÆ goals are evaluated at 6, 12, & 18 months for institutional changes in survivorship activities. The first program was held July 13-15, 2006 for 53 teams (106 participants); 75% of the teams had one or more oncology nurses. The institutional barriers identified pre-course were lack of survivorship knowledge (94%), financial constraints (61%), staff philosophy that excluded survivorship (15%) and lack of administrative support (6%). Course evaluations revealed a rating of quality of content at 4.6 on a scale of 1-5 (5=best) The 159 institutional goals used in following participantsÆ post program progress were divided into major categories: educational endeavors; changes in organizational structure; development of new clinical processes; specific survivorship activities; and research on survivorship. First 6 month follow up data will be presented and include the characteristics of institutional barriers and the experience of goal implementation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:14Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: National Cancer Institute. 1-R25-CA 107109-01-A1-Survivorship for Quality Cancer Care.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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