FROM CHEMO-CAUTIOUS TO CHEMO QUEENS - DEVELOPING CONFIDENCE AND COMPETENCE IN A NEW CHEMOTHERAPY ADMINISTRATION SERVICE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165256
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
FROM CHEMO-CAUTIOUS TO CHEMO QUEENS - DEVELOPING CONFIDENCE AND COMPETENCE IN A NEW CHEMOTHERAPY ADMINISTRATION SERVICE
Author(s):
Griffin, Elaine; Matawaran, Jasmine; Vasichko, Donna; Strahan, Rosa; Mirhamadiha, Akram; Cutrer, Tina
Author Details:
Elaine Griffin, MSC(A) RN AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Presbyterian Hospital of Plano, Plano, Texas, USA, email: elainemgriffin@yahoo.com; Jasmine Matawaran, RN, BSN; Donna Vasichko, RN, CMSN; Rosa Strahan, RN, BSN; Akram Mirhamadiha, RN, CMSN; Tina Cutrer, RPh, MS
Abstract:
With the growth in oncology programs over the past several years, many small-to-medium sized suburban and rural hospitals now offer oncology services. The initiation of chemotherapy administration is challenging to staff nurses. It frequently occurs on non-dedicated oncology units, provided by nurses inexperienced with oncology patients. The experienced preceptors found on established oncology units are absent as are many human and informational resources. This creates high anxiety for practicing these new skills in a safe and competent manner and increases the risk for error. This abstract describes the initiation of a successful program for progressive chemotherapy competence and clinical support in a new oncology program. Interventions include education, informational resources, and clinical and administrative support. In addition to the Chemotherapy and Biotherapy Course, nurses also receive education related to safety and oncology patient care. Informational resources are rapidly acquired or developed in response to staff needs. Beginning with informal unit leaders, nurses were precepted by the CNS and gradually developed into the preceptor role. Chemotherapy administration initially was restricted to times when adequately competent staff were available; availability of service increased with staff confidence and competence. Nurses have the option of continuing to work informally with a preceptor after completing required education and skill validation; the endpoint of the precepting experience is confidence, not just competence. After 1 year, 75% of eligible nursing staff is administering chemotherapy without CNS supervision. Performance on all nursing-sensitive quality indicators for chemotherapy meet or exceed national benchmarks. Staff nurses express confidence with their chemotherapy administration skills and are enthusiastic in promoting their new specialty to others. Patient and physician satisfaction is good and the oncology program has grown ahead of initial projections. The successful implementation of a new service requires the staff to be confident in their own competence. Critical to our program is responsiveness to the needs of the staff. Support and flexibility from administrators and oncologists has been essential to make this work. Our program has been very successful in developing nurses who feel confident as well as competent.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFROM CHEMO-CAUTIOUS TO CHEMO QUEENS - DEVELOPING CONFIDENCE AND COMPETENCE IN A NEW CHEMOTHERAPY ADMINISTRATION SERVICEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, Elaineen_US
dc.contributor.authorMatawaran, Jasmineen_US
dc.contributor.authorVasichko, Donnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorStrahan, Rosaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMirhamadiha, Akramen_US
dc.contributor.authorCutrer, Tinaen_US
dc.author.detailsElaine Griffin, MSC(A) RN AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Presbyterian Hospital of Plano, Plano, Texas, USA, email: elainemgriffin@yahoo.com; Jasmine Matawaran, RN, BSN; Donna Vasichko, RN, CMSN; Rosa Strahan, RN, BSN; Akram Mirhamadiha, RN, CMSN; Tina Cutrer, RPh, MSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165256-
dc.description.abstractWith the growth in oncology programs over the past several years, many small-to-medium sized suburban and rural hospitals now offer oncology services. The initiation of chemotherapy administration is challenging to staff nurses. It frequently occurs on non-dedicated oncology units, provided by nurses inexperienced with oncology patients. The experienced preceptors found on established oncology units are absent as are many human and informational resources. This creates high anxiety for practicing these new skills in a safe and competent manner and increases the risk for error. This abstract describes the initiation of a successful program for progressive chemotherapy competence and clinical support in a new oncology program. Interventions include education, informational resources, and clinical and administrative support. In addition to the Chemotherapy and Biotherapy Course, nurses also receive education related to safety and oncology patient care. Informational resources are rapidly acquired or developed in response to staff needs. Beginning with informal unit leaders, nurses were precepted by the CNS and gradually developed into the preceptor role. Chemotherapy administration initially was restricted to times when adequately competent staff were available; availability of service increased with staff confidence and competence. Nurses have the option of continuing to work informally with a preceptor after completing required education and skill validation; the endpoint of the precepting experience is confidence, not just competence. After 1 year, 75% of eligible nursing staff is administering chemotherapy without CNS supervision. Performance on all nursing-sensitive quality indicators for chemotherapy meet or exceed national benchmarks. Staff nurses express confidence with their chemotherapy administration skills and are enthusiastic in promoting their new specialty to others. Patient and physician satisfaction is good and the oncology program has grown ahead of initial projections. The successful implementation of a new service requires the staff to be confident in their own competence. Critical to our program is responsiveness to the needs of the staff. Support and flexibility from administrators and oncologists has been essential to make this work. Our program has been very successful in developing nurses who feel confident as well as competent.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:17Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.