2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165258
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
TIMELY COLORECTAL CANCER SCREENING IN AFRICAN AMERICANS
Author(s):
Griffith, Kathleen; Plowden, Keith; McGuire, Deborah; Royak-Schaler, Renee; Steinberger, Eileen
Author Details:
Kathleen Griffith, PHD CRNP AOCN, Postdoctoral Fellow, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: kgriffith@jhmi.edu; Keith Plowden, PhD, RN; Deborah McGuire, PhD, RN, FAAN, University of Maryland, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland; Renee Royak-Schaler, PhD, MEd; Eileen Steinberger, MD, MS, University of Maryland, School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
Abstract:
African Americans have low rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, and little is known about factors influencing their participation. This study sought to identify biological, psychosocial/behavioral, and social factors that predicted timely CRC screening (i.e. completion of risk-appropriate tests within a recommended time frame) in African American (AA) men and women aged > 40 in Maryland. Cancer screening and prevention have been ranked within the top 10 research priorities for ONS in both 2000 and 2004. The Biopsychosocial BPS) Model was used to guide this study. Data from 580 AA participants in the 2002 Maryland Cancer Survey (MCS) were examined in a secondary analysis to determine whether biological (age, gender, CRC family history), psychosocial/behavioral (mammogram and prostate specific antigen [PSA] screening history, body mass index, activity level, fruit/vegetable consumption, alcohol, smoking, cancer concern, cancer perceived risk, perception of familial cancer), and social (education, employment, insurance, access to healthcare provider [HCP], and HCP recommendation of fecal occult blood test and/or sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy) factors predicted timely CRC screening. Simultaneous, hierarchical block, and stepwise entry logistic regression analyses of individual and grouped variables were conducted. For individuals without a family history of CRC (n=473), HCP recommendation of fecal occult blood test (OR 11.90, 95% CI: 6.84, 20.71) and sigmoidoscopy/colonscopy (OR 7.06, 95% CI 4.11, 12.14), moderate/vigorous activity (OR 1.70, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.82), and history of PSA screening (OR 2.81, 95% CI 1.01, 7.81) predicted timely CRC screening. For individuals with a family history of CRC (N=86) recommendation of sigmoidoscopy/colonscopy (OR 24.3, 95% CI 5.30, 111.34) and vigorous activity (OR 5.21, 95% CI: 1.09, 24.88) predicted timely CRC screening. CRC family history did not predict screening when age, education, and insurance were controlled. HCP recommendation was the most important predictor of timely CRC screening, regardless of family history of CRC. Investigation of other potential predictors of screening not available in the MCS dataset and socioeconomic and other variables that limit access to HCPs is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTIMELY COLORECTAL CANCER SCREENING IN AFRICAN AMERICANSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGriffith, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorPlowden, Keithen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoyak-Schaler, Reneeen_US
dc.contributor.authorSteinberger, Eileenen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Griffith, PHD CRNP AOCN, Postdoctoral Fellow, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: kgriffith@jhmi.edu; Keith Plowden, PhD, RN; Deborah McGuire, PhD, RN, FAAN, University of Maryland, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland; Renee Royak-Schaler, PhD, MEd; Eileen Steinberger, MD, MS, University of Maryland, School of Public Health, Baltimore, Marylanden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165258-
dc.description.abstractAfrican Americans have low rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, and little is known about factors influencing their participation. This study sought to identify biological, psychosocial/behavioral, and social factors that predicted timely CRC screening (i.e. completion of risk-appropriate tests within a recommended time frame) in African American (AA) men and women aged > 40 in Maryland. Cancer screening and prevention have been ranked within the top 10 research priorities for ONS in both 2000 and 2004. The Biopsychosocial BPS) Model was used to guide this study. Data from 580 AA participants in the 2002 Maryland Cancer Survey (MCS) were examined in a secondary analysis to determine whether biological (age, gender, CRC family history), psychosocial/behavioral (mammogram and prostate specific antigen [PSA] screening history, body mass index, activity level, fruit/vegetable consumption, alcohol, smoking, cancer concern, cancer perceived risk, perception of familial cancer), and social (education, employment, insurance, access to healthcare provider [HCP], and HCP recommendation of fecal occult blood test and/or sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy) factors predicted timely CRC screening. Simultaneous, hierarchical block, and stepwise entry logistic regression analyses of individual and grouped variables were conducted. For individuals without a family history of CRC (n=473), HCP recommendation of fecal occult blood test (OR 11.90, 95% CI: 6.84, 20.71) and sigmoidoscopy/colonscopy (OR 7.06, 95% CI 4.11, 12.14), moderate/vigorous activity (OR 1.70, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.82), and history of PSA screening (OR 2.81, 95% CI 1.01, 7.81) predicted timely CRC screening. For individuals with a family history of CRC (N=86) recommendation of sigmoidoscopy/colonscopy (OR 24.3, 95% CI 5.30, 111.34) and vigorous activity (OR 5.21, 95% CI: 1.09, 24.88) predicted timely CRC screening. CRC family history did not predict screening when age, education, and insurance were controlled. HCP recommendation was the most important predictor of timely CRC screening, regardless of family history of CRC. Investigation of other potential predictors of screening not available in the MCS dataset and socioeconomic and other variables that limit access to HCPs is warranted.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:19Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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