PROFESSIONAL BEREAVEMENT AND RESILIENCY: WHAT DOES THIS MEAN TO ONCOLOGY NURSES?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165260
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PROFESSIONAL BEREAVEMENT AND RESILIENCY: WHAT DOES THIS MEAN TO ONCOLOGY NURSES?
Author(s):
Grover, Michelle; Krumm, Sharon; Wenzel, Jennifer; Shaha, Maya
Author Details:
Michelle Grover, MSN MBA RN OCN, Nurse Clinician III; Project Coordinator, SBRP, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: grovemi@jhmi.edu; Sharon Krumm, PhD, RN; Jennifer Wenzel, PhD, RN, CCM; Maya Shaha, PhD, MSc, RN, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland; Susan Bauer-Wu, DNSc, RN
Abstract:
Oncology nurses invest considerable physical and emotional energy in caring for their patients. When patients die, nurses may experience acute or latent feelings of grief or a sense of meaninglessness. If nurses are unsupported with these losses, they may burn-out, choose to leave the workplace, or oncology nursing altogether. When supported in time-sensitive and helpful ways, nurses create and share a culture of self-care and self-respect. This supportive work culture promotes a wider range of interpersonal functioning, wellness and resiliency, thereby potentially reducing staff inclinations to terminate positions or the specialty. The purpose of the Staff Bereavement and Resiliency Program (SBRP) at this NCI designated comprehensive cancer center is to promote a supportive work culture for adult and pediatric oncology nurses based on results from a mixed methods study. Focus groups were held with staff nurses in order to identify different aspects of bereavement and work-related stress, current support for managing stress, as well as potential stress-reducing self-care interventions. Following analysis of the focus group results, an electronic survey was sent to every adult and pediatric oncology nurse to further clarify themes identified in the focus groups and to learn more about the impact of stress on the nurses. Specific interventions identified by the survey results will be implemented to better support these nurses at individual, unit, and departmental levels. Each interventionÆs effectiveness will be evaluated by the nurses. Nurse satisfaction, patient safety, absenteeism, and nurse turnover and vacancy data will also be evaluated. It is important to learn directly from the staff what they identify as significant work-related stressors and what interventions they believe can best support them. Experienced, professional oncology nurses contribute significantly to patientsÆ well-being and clinical outcomes, and to the advancement of the art and science of oncology nursing. Oncology nurses are precious resources and should be nurtured and supported. This SRBP program can serve as a model for other cancer centers in supporting and nurturing their oncology nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePROFESSIONAL BEREAVEMENT AND RESILIENCY: WHAT DOES THIS MEAN TO ONCOLOGY NURSES?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrover, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorKrumm, Sharonen_US
dc.contributor.authorWenzel, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorShaha, Mayaen_US
dc.author.detailsMichelle Grover, MSN MBA RN OCN, Nurse Clinician III; Project Coordinator, SBRP, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: grovemi@jhmi.edu; Sharon Krumm, PhD, RN; Jennifer Wenzel, PhD, RN, CCM; Maya Shaha, PhD, MSc, RN, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland; Susan Bauer-Wu, DNSc, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165260-
dc.description.abstractOncology nurses invest considerable physical and emotional energy in caring for their patients. When patients die, nurses may experience acute or latent feelings of grief or a sense of meaninglessness. If nurses are unsupported with these losses, they may burn-out, choose to leave the workplace, or oncology nursing altogether. When supported in time-sensitive and helpful ways, nurses create and share a culture of self-care and self-respect. This supportive work culture promotes a wider range of interpersonal functioning, wellness and resiliency, thereby potentially reducing staff inclinations to terminate positions or the specialty. The purpose of the Staff Bereavement and Resiliency Program (SBRP) at this NCI designated comprehensive cancer center is to promote a supportive work culture for adult and pediatric oncology nurses based on results from a mixed methods study. Focus groups were held with staff nurses in order to identify different aspects of bereavement and work-related stress, current support for managing stress, as well as potential stress-reducing self-care interventions. Following analysis of the focus group results, an electronic survey was sent to every adult and pediatric oncology nurse to further clarify themes identified in the focus groups and to learn more about the impact of stress on the nurses. Specific interventions identified by the survey results will be implemented to better support these nurses at individual, unit, and departmental levels. Each interventionÆs effectiveness will be evaluated by the nurses. Nurse satisfaction, patient safety, absenteeism, and nurse turnover and vacancy data will also be evaluated. It is important to learn directly from the staff what they identify as significant work-related stressors and what interventions they believe can best support them. Experienced, professional oncology nurses contribute significantly to patientsÆ well-being and clinical outcomes, and to the advancement of the art and science of oncology nursing. Oncology nurses are precious resources and should be nurtured and supported. This SRBP program can serve as a model for other cancer centers in supporting and nurturing their oncology nurses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:21Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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