UNSCHEDULED DNA SYNTHESIS IN WOMEN AT HIGH RISK VS. NORMAL RISK FOR BREAST CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165263
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
UNSCHEDULED DNA SYNTHESIS IN WOMEN AT HIGH RISK VS. NORMAL RISK FOR BREAST CANCER
Author(s):
Eggert, Julie; Romerez, Cathy; Larcom, Lyndon
Author Details:
Julie Eggert, PhD, C-GNP, AOCN, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, USA; Cathy Romerez, MS; Lyndon Larcom, PhD
Abstract:
Breast Cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer in women. Developing a simple blood test that could identify early DNA changes in a sub-population of white blood cells could yield a variety of implications for earlier detection of this malignancy thereby impacting the medical, psychosocial and economic aspects for high-risk patients and their families. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine 1) if there was a difference in unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in a sub-population of white blood cells common to the stress and chronic inflammation mechanisms of women at high-risk for breast cancer vs those at low-risk and, 2) if the UDS occurred in CD-14 cells. The physiologic mechanisms of the body's response to stress and chronic inflammation were used as the theoretical framework. The Gail Model was used to assess level of risk for developing breast cancer. Based on the literature a 1.7% Gail Model Risk was used to differentiate high versus low-risk women. Women with and without a family history of breast cancer were included in the sampling. White blood cells were separated from serum. Both control and experimental cell groups were aliquoted. A third sample was obtained for evaluation by cell flow cytometry. Experimental samples were damaged with Ultra0Violet light and treated with tritiated-thymidine to mark UDS. Both sample groups were incubated and lysed to obtain double-stranded DNA for identifying UDS. The levels of UDS were counted and compared for differences between the high and low-risk groups. One sample group of cells was labeled with antibody to CD-14 cells and identified using cell flow cytometry. T-tests were performed to determine the mean UDS difference between high and low-risk groups. Cell flo cytometry results identified CD-14 labeled cells as those with increased levels of UDS. The mean repair measure (UDS), in counts per minute, (267.2 +/- 216.3) was significantly higher for the high-risk group (p< 0.01) than mean repair counts for the low-risk group (84.8 +/- 56.0). This suggests breast cancer risk affects UDS in CD-14 cells.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUNSCHEDULED DNA SYNTHESIS IN WOMEN AT HIGH RISK VS. NORMAL RISK FOR BREAST CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEggert, Julieen_US
dc.contributor.authorRomerez, Cathyen_US
dc.contributor.authorLarcom, Lyndonen_US
dc.author.detailsJulie Eggert, PhD, C-GNP, AOCN, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, USA; Cathy Romerez, MS; Lyndon Larcom, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165263-
dc.description.abstractBreast Cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer in women. Developing a simple blood test that could identify early DNA changes in a sub-population of white blood cells could yield a variety of implications for earlier detection of this malignancy thereby impacting the medical, psychosocial and economic aspects for high-risk patients and their families. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine 1) if there was a difference in unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in a sub-population of white blood cells common to the stress and chronic inflammation mechanisms of women at high-risk for breast cancer vs those at low-risk and, 2) if the UDS occurred in CD-14 cells. The physiologic mechanisms of the body's response to stress and chronic inflammation were used as the theoretical framework. The Gail Model was used to assess level of risk for developing breast cancer. Based on the literature a 1.7% Gail Model Risk was used to differentiate high versus low-risk women. Women with and without a family history of breast cancer were included in the sampling. White blood cells were separated from serum. Both control and experimental cell groups were aliquoted. A third sample was obtained for evaluation by cell flow cytometry. Experimental samples were damaged with Ultra0Violet light and treated with tritiated-thymidine to mark UDS. Both sample groups were incubated and lysed to obtain double-stranded DNA for identifying UDS. The levels of UDS were counted and compared for differences between the high and low-risk groups. One sample group of cells was labeled with antibody to CD-14 cells and identified using cell flow cytometry. T-tests were performed to determine the mean UDS difference between high and low-risk groups. Cell flo cytometry results identified CD-14 labeled cells as those with increased levels of UDS. The mean repair measure (UDS), in counts per minute, (267.2 +/- 216.3) was significantly higher for the high-risk group (p&lt; 0.01) than mean repair counts for the low-risk group (84.8 +/- 56.0). This suggests breast cancer risk affects UDS in CD-14 cells.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:25Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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