IDENTIFYING CLASSES OF CAREGIVING ACTIVITIES: HELPING FAMILY CAREGIVERS DO IT ALL BETTER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165264
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
IDENTIFYING CLASSES OF CAREGIVING ACTIVITIES: HELPING FAMILY CAREGIVERS DO IT ALL BETTER
Author(s):
Eldredge, Deborah; Nail, Lillian; Maziarz, Richard; Archbold, Patricia
Author Details:
Deborah Eldredge, PhD, RN, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA; Lillian Nail, PhD, RN, FAAN; Richard Maziarz, MD; Patricia Archbold, DNSc, RN, FAAN
Abstract:
Responsibility for safely caring for high-risk medically-fragile patients following autologous blood and marrow transplant (ABMT) has been shifted to family caregivers (FCGs) who are expected to provide complex care at home. Caregiving is often embedded in omnibus measures or approached as a global construct. Identifying classes of caregiving activities is essential to understanding the complex relationships among caregiving and outcomes. To this end, three types of caregiving were inductively derived from 100 activities: performing usual care (supervising scheduled medications, keeping house clean, preparing nutritious foods), providing emotional support (talking with BMT recipients when sad, discussing how people respond to recipients’ illness), and making care-based decisions (prn medications, noticing subtle changes, prioritizing care issues). The purpose of this paper is to describe relationships among preparedness for caregiving, expected difficulty with caregiving, and caregiver role strain (CRS) for these three types of caregiving activities. In addition, we will examine the relative contribution of preparedness, expectations of caregiving, and ABMT recipient function on the three types of CRS. Family caregiving was viewed from an interactionist perspective, suggesting that characteristics of and interactions among FCGs, recipients, and the health care system influence the nature of caregiving and subsequent responses to caregiving. This is a descriptive longitudinal study. FCGs (n = 39) completed a self-report caregiving profile questionnaires at hospital discharge (T1) and again two weeks later (T2). FCGs were on average 50 years old, female (74%), Caucasian (84%), and well educated. Newly constructed caregiving subscales were reliable (alpha > .78). Descriptive statistics, correlation, and simultaneous regression techniques. At discharge, caregivers were least prepared to make care-based decisions, and expect decision making to be most difficult. However, at T2, FCGs report the highest strain in providing emotional support. Consistent with other studies, disruption in patient function is the strongest predictor of all types of CRS. The pattern for preparedness for caregiving, expected difficulty of caregiving, and CRS is not consistent across these types of caregiving. Discharge teaching may not adequately address FCGs’ experiences in making care-based decisions or providing emotional support. We need innovative ways to increase FCGs’ skills in caring for ABMT recipients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Genentech, Inc.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIDENTIFYING CLASSES OF CAREGIVING ACTIVITIES: HELPING FAMILY CAREGIVERS DO IT ALL BETTERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEldredge, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorNail, Lillianen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaziarz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorArchbold, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Eldredge, PhD, RN, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA; Lillian Nail, PhD, RN, FAAN; Richard Maziarz, MD; Patricia Archbold, DNSc, RN, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165264-
dc.description.abstractResponsibility for safely caring for high-risk medically-fragile patients following autologous blood and marrow transplant (ABMT) has been shifted to family caregivers (FCGs) who are expected to provide complex care at home. Caregiving is often embedded in omnibus measures or approached as a global construct. Identifying classes of caregiving activities is essential to understanding the complex relationships among caregiving and outcomes. To this end, three types of caregiving were inductively derived from 100 activities: performing usual care (supervising scheduled medications, keeping house clean, preparing nutritious foods), providing emotional support (talking with BMT recipients when sad, discussing how people respond to recipients’ illness), and making care-based decisions (prn medications, noticing subtle changes, prioritizing care issues). The purpose of this paper is to describe relationships among preparedness for caregiving, expected difficulty with caregiving, and caregiver role strain (CRS) for these three types of caregiving activities. In addition, we will examine the relative contribution of preparedness, expectations of caregiving, and ABMT recipient function on the three types of CRS. Family caregiving was viewed from an interactionist perspective, suggesting that characteristics of and interactions among FCGs, recipients, and the health care system influence the nature of caregiving and subsequent responses to caregiving. This is a descriptive longitudinal study. FCGs (n = 39) completed a self-report caregiving profile questionnaires at hospital discharge (T1) and again two weeks later (T2). FCGs were on average 50 years old, female (74%), Caucasian (84%), and well educated. Newly constructed caregiving subscales were reliable (alpha > .78). Descriptive statistics, correlation, and simultaneous regression techniques. At discharge, caregivers were least prepared to make care-based decisions, and expect decision making to be most difficult. However, at T2, FCGs report the highest strain in providing emotional support. Consistent with other studies, disruption in patient function is the strongest predictor of all types of CRS. The pattern for preparedness for caregiving, expected difficulty of caregiving, and CRS is not consistent across these types of caregiving. Discharge teaching may not adequately address FCGs’ experiences in making care-based decisions or providing emotional support. We need innovative ways to increase FCGs’ skills in caring for ABMT recipients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:26Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Genentech, Inc.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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