2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165268
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE MEANING OF HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE
Author(s):
Ferrans, Carol
Author Details:
Carol Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Abstract:
Evaluation of outcomes in terms of health-related quality of life (QOL) has become increasingly important in health care. Nevertheless, because the term "quality of life" has been used to mean so many different things, it is difficult to compare findings, draw conclusions, and apply in clinical practice. For example, QOL can refer to health status, physical functioning, symptoms, psychosocial adjustment, well-being, life satisfaction, and happiness. The purpose of this presentation is to provide guidance for coherent use of the construct, based on examination of multidisciplinary literature over the past 30 years. A number of well-established instruments are available for assessment of QOL in cancer care. The domains of various instruments have been well characterized in the literature, but less attention has been paid to the aspect of QOL they actually measure, such as health status or life satisfaction. This is important, because conclusions about the effectiveness of treatment may differ depending on which one is used to measure outcomes. What is meant by QOL also differs in scope. The most narrow definitions focus only on the correction of health problems. The most broad encompass positive as well as negative aspects, such as finding meaning in life and peace of mind. The ultimate objective for assessment of QOL is enhanced well-being. To promote this positive objective, the focus of health care needs to move beyond health problems, loss of abilities, or functional deficits. This has been recognized particularly in end-of-life and palliative care, when interventions are aimed at providing comfort and emotional support, to maximize QOL at the end of life. QOL evaluations provide an important tool for understanding individual differences in response to illness. This includes individual changes that occur in the process of adapting to cancer and treatment, including the re-evaluation of one’s life in the context of a life-threatening disease. They provide an understanding of the impact of illness from the viewpoint of the patient, which is more than health status and physical functioning.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: National Cancer Institute (NIH) -- Cancer Outcomes Measurement Working Group
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE MEANING OF HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFerrans, Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165268-
dc.description.abstractEvaluation of outcomes in terms of health-related quality of life (QOL) has become increasingly important in health care. Nevertheless, because the term "quality of life" has been used to mean so many different things, it is difficult to compare findings, draw conclusions, and apply in clinical practice. For example, QOL can refer to health status, physical functioning, symptoms, psychosocial adjustment, well-being, life satisfaction, and happiness. The purpose of this presentation is to provide guidance for coherent use of the construct, based on examination of multidisciplinary literature over the past 30 years. A number of well-established instruments are available for assessment of QOL in cancer care. The domains of various instruments have been well characterized in the literature, but less attention has been paid to the aspect of QOL they actually measure, such as health status or life satisfaction. This is important, because conclusions about the effectiveness of treatment may differ depending on which one is used to measure outcomes. What is meant by QOL also differs in scope. The most narrow definitions focus only on the correction of health problems. The most broad encompass positive as well as negative aspects, such as finding meaning in life and peace of mind. The ultimate objective for assessment of QOL is enhanced well-being. To promote this positive objective, the focus of health care needs to move beyond health problems, loss of abilities, or functional deficits. This has been recognized particularly in end-of-life and palliative care, when interventions are aimed at providing comfort and emotional support, to maximize QOL at the end of life. QOL evaluations provide an important tool for understanding individual differences in response to illness. This includes individual changes that occur in the process of adapting to cancer and treatment, including the re-evaluation of one’s life in the context of a life-threatening disease. They provide an understanding of the impact of illness from the viewpoint of the patient, which is more than health status and physical functioning.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:30Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: National Cancer Institute (NIH) -- Cancer Outcomes Measurement Working Group-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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