2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165273
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SURVIVORSHIP RESEARCH: METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES AND STRATEGIES
Author(s):
Grant, Marcia; Ferrell, Betty; Cooke, Elizabeth; Juarez, Gloria
Author Details:
Marcia Grant, RN, DNSc, FAAN, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA; Betty Ferrell, PhD, FAAN; Elizabeth Cooke, RN, MN, AOCN, ANP; Gloria Juarez, RN, PhD
Abstract:
About 1,368,030 new cancer cases are expected in 2004, and of those 63% are expected to survive five years or more. The Office of Cancer Survivorship (OCS) at the National Cancer Institute reports that as of January 1997, an estimated 8.9 million cancer survivors were living in the U.S. The need for studies to improve quality of life (QOL) for survivors is increasing in priority as a larger proportion of the population fall into this group. The purpose of this paper is to provide examples of methods used to overcome challenges in studying QOL in different survivor groups. Issues addressed will include design selection, subject recruitment and follow-up, instrument burden, dosing of intervention, and solving cultural challenges. Examples will include studies of QOL in ovarian cancer survivors using both a qualitative analysis of correspondence through an ovarian cancer newsletter, quantitative analysis of QOL and a nursing intervention trial; approaches to decreasing subject burden in an intervention study of vulnerable bone marrow transplant early survivors; finding sufficient numbers of cancer patients with ostomies to describe QOL over time; and meeting the issues of language, translation and trust when conducting cross cultural issues in breast cancer survivors. Methods will focus on selecting the appropriate framework; internet support for finding, recruiting, and maintaining contact with widespread populations; selecting instruments to decrease subject burden; and applying translation principles to the development and implementation of instruments for cross cultural study. Strategies demonstrated here can be applied to other studies of cancer survivors and provide evidence-based recommendations for follow up care for this large component of our population. As survivors increase, the need for rigorous studies describing and improving quality of life for cancer survivors are essential.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Funded by the NCI and by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Genentech.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSURVIVORSHIP RESEARCH: METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES AND STRATEGIESen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Marciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFerrell, Bettyen_US
dc.contributor.authorCooke, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorJuarez, Gloriaen_US
dc.author.detailsMarcia Grant, RN, DNSc, FAAN, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA; Betty Ferrell, PhD, FAAN; Elizabeth Cooke, RN, MN, AOCN, ANP; Gloria Juarez, RN, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165273-
dc.description.abstractAbout 1,368,030 new cancer cases are expected in 2004, and of those 63% are expected to survive five years or more. The Office of Cancer Survivorship (OCS) at the National Cancer Institute reports that as of January 1997, an estimated 8.9 million cancer survivors were living in the U.S. The need for studies to improve quality of life (QOL) for survivors is increasing in priority as a larger proportion of the population fall into this group. The purpose of this paper is to provide examples of methods used to overcome challenges in studying QOL in different survivor groups. Issues addressed will include design selection, subject recruitment and follow-up, instrument burden, dosing of intervention, and solving cultural challenges. Examples will include studies of QOL in ovarian cancer survivors using both a qualitative analysis of correspondence through an ovarian cancer newsletter, quantitative analysis of QOL and a nursing intervention trial; approaches to decreasing subject burden in an intervention study of vulnerable bone marrow transplant early survivors; finding sufficient numbers of cancer patients with ostomies to describe QOL over time; and meeting the issues of language, translation and trust when conducting cross cultural issues in breast cancer survivors. Methods will focus on selecting the appropriate framework; internet support for finding, recruiting, and maintaining contact with widespread populations; selecting instruments to decrease subject burden; and applying translation principles to the development and implementation of instruments for cross cultural study. Strategies demonstrated here can be applied to other studies of cancer survivors and provide evidence-based recommendations for follow up care for this large component of our population. As survivors increase, the need for rigorous studies describing and improving quality of life for cancer survivors are essential.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:36Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Funded by the NCI and by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Genentech.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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