2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165274
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ATTITUDINAL BARRIERS TO CANCER PAIN MANAGEMENT IN THE ICELANDIC POPULATION
Author(s):
Gunnarsdottir, Sigridur
Author Details:
Sigridur Gunnarsdottir, RN,MS, University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland
Abstract:
Attitudes about pain among patients, their family members and the lay-public can be barriers to pain management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of attitudinal barriers to cancer-pain management among the general population of Iceland and to evaluate relationships between barriers and background variables. The study is based on Ward and colleagues framework where attitudinal barriers (e.g. fear of addiction) interfere with pain management (under-utilization of analgesics) and consequently quality of life. The present study—the first in a developing program of research—targets the antecedent variables (attitudes). A random sample of 1286 Icelandic adults was drawn from a national registry holding information about all 278,000 citizens of Iceland. Data collection was conducted with a postal-survey based on The Total Design Method. Barriers were evaluated with the Icelandic Barriers Questionnaire-II (IBQ-II), a reliable and valid measure. Descriptive statistics and ANCOVA were used for data analyses. Of 1286 invited, 599 (46.6%) completed the survey. The mean (SD) age of respondents and non-respondents was 45.28(17.14) and 44.25(19.44) respectively. Majority of respondents were female (55.8%), while 47.6% of non-respondents were female. The mean (SD) length of education for respondents was 13.81(4.27) years. Half (55.6%) had personal experience with cancer; of those 95.7% had a relative or a close friend so diagnosed and in addition 33 (10%) had been diagnosed with cancer themselves. The mean (SD) IBQ-II score was 2.16(0.77), on a scale of 0 to 5, with higher scores indicating stronger barriers. Men had higher barriers scores than women, and education was inversely related to barriers. Those who had personal experience with cancer had lower barriers than those who did not, and those identifying themselves as health care professionals had lower IBQ-II scores than those who did not. Barriers to cancer pain management are prevalent in Iceland. They are also stronger than what has been seen in previous research conducted in other countries. These findings support the need for interventions aimed at such barriers. This data will aid in the design, implementation, and evaluation of educational interventions and quality-improvement-projects, aimed at overcoming barriers to management of cancer-pain.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Janssen Pharmaceutica Products LP. Research grant from Sigma Theta Tau International. Research grant from the Icelandic Cancer Society.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleATTITUDINAL BARRIERS TO CANCER PAIN MANAGEMENT IN THE ICELANDIC POPULATIONen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Sigriduren_US
dc.author.detailsSigridur Gunnarsdottir, RN,MS, University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Icelanden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165274-
dc.description.abstractAttitudes about pain among patients, their family members and the lay-public can be barriers to pain management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of attitudinal barriers to cancer-pain management among the general population of Iceland and to evaluate relationships between barriers and background variables. The study is based on Ward and colleagues framework where attitudinal barriers (e.g. fear of addiction) interfere with pain management (under-utilization of analgesics) and consequently quality of life. The present study—the first in a developing program of research—targets the antecedent variables (attitudes). A random sample of 1286 Icelandic adults was drawn from a national registry holding information about all 278,000 citizens of Iceland. Data collection was conducted with a postal-survey based on The Total Design Method. Barriers were evaluated with the Icelandic Barriers Questionnaire-II (IBQ-II), a reliable and valid measure. Descriptive statistics and ANCOVA were used for data analyses. Of 1286 invited, 599 (46.6%) completed the survey. The mean (SD) age of respondents and non-respondents was 45.28(17.14) and 44.25(19.44) respectively. Majority of respondents were female (55.8%), while 47.6% of non-respondents were female. The mean (SD) length of education for respondents was 13.81(4.27) years. Half (55.6%) had personal experience with cancer; of those 95.7% had a relative or a close friend so diagnosed and in addition 33 (10%) had been diagnosed with cancer themselves. The mean (SD) IBQ-II score was 2.16(0.77), on a scale of 0 to 5, with higher scores indicating stronger barriers. Men had higher barriers scores than women, and education was inversely related to barriers. Those who had personal experience with cancer had lower barriers than those who did not, and those identifying themselves as health care professionals had lower IBQ-II scores than those who did not. Barriers to cancer pain management are prevalent in Iceland. They are also stronger than what has been seen in previous research conducted in other countries. These findings support the need for interventions aimed at such barriers. This data will aid in the design, implementation, and evaluation of educational interventions and quality-improvement-projects, aimed at overcoming barriers to management of cancer-pain.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:37Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Janssen Pharmaceutica Products LP. Research grant from Sigma Theta Tau International. Research grant from the Icelandic Cancer Society.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.