SUBJECT RECRUITMENT FOR CANCER CONTROL STUDIES IN AN UNFAVORABLE ENVIRONMENT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165277
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SUBJECT RECRUITMENT FOR CANCER CONTROL STUDIES IN AN UNFAVORABLE ENVIRONMENT
Author(s):
Heiney, Sue; Adams, Swann; Hebert, James; Cunningham, Joan
Author Details:
Sue Heiney, PhD, RN, CS, FAAN, SC Cancer Center, Columbia South Carolina, USA; Swann Adams, PhD; James Hebert, DrSc; Joan Cunningham, PhD
Abstract:
Using Lewin's model of change, this paper summarizes recruitment lessons learned from 4 studies: a quasi-experimental comparison of breast cancer patients and controls; an exploratory study of breast cancer patient's knowledge and experience with lymphedema, an experimental study of an intervention to improve QOL and an experimental study of an intervention for men with prostate cancer. The recruitment of subjects was an enormous challenge due to unfavorable community and professional environments. A post hoc examination of recruitment strategies using Lewin's force field analysis was conducted. Driving and restraining forces for recruitment were explicated and evaluated to successful and unworkable strategies. Also, forces that we should have worked to change the direction of were distinguished. Also, each stage of change was evaluated to identify major components of unfreezing, moving and refreezing. Since some of the projects are ongoing, these efforts were directed toward increasing recruitment and planning for future studies. Drivers included medical oncologists, mammographers and patients from previous studies. Resisters included staff in the mammography clinic, IRB members and urologists. The strength of this approach is that it points to where energy should be directed. Also, it prevents over focusing on either resistors or drivers which tended to recruitment efforts. Resistance often increased, especially in the hospital departments when administrative drivers increased. This approach also identified that more time should have been spent in unfreezing since this environment was unfamiliar with cancer control studies and viewed them from the perspective of drug trials. Lewin's model was especially useful in that it increased researcher objectivity as to the source of recruitment obstacles. This perspective prevented the problem from being personalized and becoming a hostile situation. If this approach had been used in the first study, subjects would have been accrued much faster. Planning for recruitment using this model would have saved time even though the upfront time seemed wasteful, especially with limited funding periods. Nurse researchers entering a new environment for recruitment and /or working with a multi-disciplinary team would benefit from using Lewin's force field analysis prior to writing a proposal or implementing a project. While Lewin's model is not new; it's use in recruitment has not been well documented.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSUBJECT RECRUITMENT FOR CANCER CONTROL STUDIES IN AN UNFAVORABLE ENVIRONMENTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHeiney, Sueen_US
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Swannen_US
dc.contributor.authorHebert, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Joanen_US
dc.author.detailsSue Heiney, PhD, RN, CS, FAAN, SC Cancer Center, Columbia South Carolina, USA; Swann Adams, PhD; James Hebert, DrSc; Joan Cunningham, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165277-
dc.description.abstractUsing Lewin's model of change, this paper summarizes recruitment lessons learned from 4 studies: a quasi-experimental comparison of breast cancer patients and controls; an exploratory study of breast cancer patient's knowledge and experience with lymphedema, an experimental study of an intervention to improve QOL and an experimental study of an intervention for men with prostate cancer. The recruitment of subjects was an enormous challenge due to unfavorable community and professional environments. A post hoc examination of recruitment strategies using Lewin's force field analysis was conducted. Driving and restraining forces for recruitment were explicated and evaluated to successful and unworkable strategies. Also, forces that we should have worked to change the direction of were distinguished. Also, each stage of change was evaluated to identify major components of unfreezing, moving and refreezing. Since some of the projects are ongoing, these efforts were directed toward increasing recruitment and planning for future studies. Drivers included medical oncologists, mammographers and patients from previous studies. Resisters included staff in the mammography clinic, IRB members and urologists. The strength of this approach is that it points to where energy should be directed. Also, it prevents over focusing on either resistors or drivers which tended to recruitment efforts. Resistance often increased, especially in the hospital departments when administrative drivers increased. This approach also identified that more time should have been spent in unfreezing since this environment was unfamiliar with cancer control studies and viewed them from the perspective of drug trials. Lewin's model was especially useful in that it increased researcher objectivity as to the source of recruitment obstacles. This perspective prevented the problem from being personalized and becoming a hostile situation. If this approach had been used in the first study, subjects would have been accrued much faster. Planning for recruitment using this model would have saved time even though the upfront time seemed wasteful, especially with limited funding periods. Nurse researchers entering a new environment for recruitment and /or working with a multi-disciplinary team would benefit from using Lewin's force field analysis prior to writing a proposal or implementing a project. While Lewin's model is not new; it's use in recruitment has not been well documented.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:40Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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