2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165278
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PUNJABI IMMIGRANT WOMENS EXPERIENCES OF BREAST CANCER.
Author(s):
Howard, Fuschia; Bottorff, Joan L.; Balneaves, Lynda G.
Author Details:
Fuschia Howard, RN, MSNc, Nursing & Health Behaviour Research Unit, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Joan L. Bottorff, PhD, RN; Lynda G. Balneaves, PhD, RN
Abstract:
There is a notable absence of women from specific ethnocultural groups in the published breast cancer research, including South Asians living in Canada. Punjabi immigrants represent the most populace group of South Asians in British Columbia. The breast cancer experiences of Punjabi women need to be understood in order to provide a framework for culturally appropriate cancer care. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the ways Punjabi immigrant women story their breast cancer experiences to uncover how women make sense of their experiences and how the women’s cultural and social world is reflected in their stories. Culture was conceptualized as dynamic, socially constructed, and produced within historical, gendered, ‘raced’ and political context, rather than neutral scripts tied to ethnic roots. A narrative ethnographic approach was used to guide this qualitative study. In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted in Punjabi and translated into English with twelve Punjabi immigrant women, who had breast cancer within the last eight years and resided in British Columbia. Interviews were analyzed using a combination of narrative analysis strategies (Mishler, 1986; Riessman, 1993; Frank, 1995; Cortazzi, 2001). Following close reading of the interviews, summaries were prepared to highlight impressions of each woman’s story. Women’s stories were then compared to identify storylines and subjected to analysis focusing on the structure and function of the narrative. Finally, consideration was given to the larger social context in which the stories were told. Based on this analysis five storylines emerged: (1) recovering from breast cancer and moving on; (2) surviving the ordeal of breast cancer; (3) suffering through breast cancer and struggling to move on; (4) being consumed by the never ending worry of breast cancer; and (5) accepting breast cancer as kismet and learning to be more devout. In these narratives the stigma of cancer limited women’s disclosure of breast cancer to their closely knit families, resulting in women feeling unable to receive additional support. Findings of this study suggest that existing research literature fails to account for all women’s experiences of breast cancer and culturally appropriate cancer care is needed to work effectively with Punjabi immigrant women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Canadian Breast Cancer Research Alliance; Nursing and Health Behaviour Research Unit, UBC; NEXUS, UBC
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePUNJABI IMMIGRANT WOMENS EXPERIENCES OF BREAST CANCER.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Fuschiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBottorff, Joan L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBalneaves, Lynda G.en_US
dc.author.detailsFuschia Howard, RN, MSNc, Nursing & Health Behaviour Research Unit, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Joan L. Bottorff, PhD, RN; Lynda G. Balneaves, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165278-
dc.description.abstractThere is a notable absence of women from specific ethnocultural groups in the published breast cancer research, including South Asians living in Canada. Punjabi immigrants represent the most populace group of South Asians in British Columbia. The breast cancer experiences of Punjabi women need to be understood in order to provide a framework for culturally appropriate cancer care. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the ways Punjabi immigrant women story their breast cancer experiences to uncover how women make sense of their experiences and how the women’s cultural and social world is reflected in their stories. Culture was conceptualized as dynamic, socially constructed, and produced within historical, gendered, ‘raced’ and political context, rather than neutral scripts tied to ethnic roots. A narrative ethnographic approach was used to guide this qualitative study. In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted in Punjabi and translated into English with twelve Punjabi immigrant women, who had breast cancer within the last eight years and resided in British Columbia. Interviews were analyzed using a combination of narrative analysis strategies (Mishler, 1986; Riessman, 1993; Frank, 1995; Cortazzi, 2001). Following close reading of the interviews, summaries were prepared to highlight impressions of each woman’s story. Women’s stories were then compared to identify storylines and subjected to analysis focusing on the structure and function of the narrative. Finally, consideration was given to the larger social context in which the stories were told. Based on this analysis five storylines emerged: (1) recovering from breast cancer and moving on; (2) surviving the ordeal of breast cancer; (3) suffering through breast cancer and struggling to move on; (4) being consumed by the never ending worry of breast cancer; and (5) accepting breast cancer as kismet and learning to be more devout. In these narratives the stigma of cancer limited women’s disclosure of breast cancer to their closely knit families, resulting in women feeling unable to receive additional support. Findings of this study suggest that existing research literature fails to account for all women’s experiences of breast cancer and culturally appropriate cancer care is needed to work effectively with Punjabi immigrant women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:41Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Canadian Breast Cancer Research Alliance; Nursing and Health Behaviour Research Unit, UBC; NEXUS, UBC-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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