DO HEALTHY WOMEN IN THE COMMUNITY RECOGNIZE HEREDITARY AND SPORADIC BREAST CANCER RISK FACTORS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165282
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DO HEALTHY WOMEN IN THE COMMUNITY RECOGNIZE HEREDITARY AND SPORADIC BREAST CANCER RISK FACTORS
Author(s):
Katapodi, Maria; Aouizerat, Bradley
Author Details:
Maria Katapodi, RN,MSN, PhD, University of California - San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; Bradley Aouizerat, PhD, Quantitative Geneticist
Abstract:
It is not clear whether women can distinguish between familial and sporadic forms of breast cancer, and whether they recognize the different role of aging, paternal family history, and ovarian cancer in predicting each form of the disease. The study aimed to 1) describe knowledge of hereditary and sporadic breast cancer risk factors among healthy women in the community, and 2) identify predictors of knowledge of breast cancer risk factors The Adoption Precaution Process (Weinstein, 1988) suggests that individualized information about one's personal risk factors facilitates an accurate perception of susceptibility to disease. This cross-sectional, community-based survey recruited 184 women from diverse racial/cultural backgrounds (43% Caucasian, 26% African-American, 17% Asian, 14% Hispanic) to complete a questionnaire in English. Participants have never been diagnosed with cancer and were between 30 and 85 years old (X=46+-12). Most (49%) were college graduates and had a median annual income $30,000 to $40,000. We assessed knowledge of hereditary and sporadic breast cancer risk factors with the Breast Cancer Risk Factors Knowledge Index (Cronbach á =.80). Descriptive statistics and hierarchical regression (Alpha set 0.05) Most women recognized the role of heredity as a risk factor , but some did not recognize the impact of paternal family history. Some did not recognize the link between breast and ovarian cancer, risk factors associated with the Gail model, and that getting older increases one’s risk. Education was an important predictor of knowledge of risk factors. Communication regarding risk factors needs to be optimized. Nursing can provide individualized risk assessment and education regarding breast cancer risk factors to women in the community.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Department of Defense, Medical Research, Clinical Nurse Researcher Award No DAMD17-03-1-0356.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDO HEALTHY WOMEN IN THE COMMUNITY RECOGNIZE HEREDITARY AND SPORADIC BREAST CANCER RISK FACTORSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKatapodi, Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAouizerat, Bradleyen_US
dc.author.detailsMaria Katapodi, RN,MSN, PhD, University of California - San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; Bradley Aouizerat, PhD, Quantitative Geneticisten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165282-
dc.description.abstractIt is not clear whether women can distinguish between familial and sporadic forms of breast cancer, and whether they recognize the different role of aging, paternal family history, and ovarian cancer in predicting each form of the disease. The study aimed to 1) describe knowledge of hereditary and sporadic breast cancer risk factors among healthy women in the community, and 2) identify predictors of knowledge of breast cancer risk factors The Adoption Precaution Process (Weinstein, 1988) suggests that individualized information about one's personal risk factors facilitates an accurate perception of susceptibility to disease. This cross-sectional, community-based survey recruited 184 women from diverse racial/cultural backgrounds (43% Caucasian, 26% African-American, 17% Asian, 14% Hispanic) to complete a questionnaire in English. Participants have never been diagnosed with cancer and were between 30 and 85 years old (X=46+-12). Most (49%) were college graduates and had a median annual income $30,000 to $40,000. We assessed knowledge of hereditary and sporadic breast cancer risk factors with the Breast Cancer Risk Factors Knowledge Index (Cronbach á =.80). Descriptive statistics and hierarchical regression (Alpha set 0.05) Most women recognized the role of heredity as a risk factor , but some did not recognize the impact of paternal family history. Some did not recognize the link between breast and ovarian cancer, risk factors associated with the Gail model, and that getting older increases one’s risk. Education was an important predictor of knowledge of risk factors. Communication regarding risk factors needs to be optimized. Nursing can provide individualized risk assessment and education regarding breast cancer risk factors to women in the community.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:45Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Department of Defense, Medical Research, Clinical Nurse Researcher Award No DAMD17-03-1-0356.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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