DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOMETRIC TESTING OF THE COPING WITH BREAST CANCER RISK INSTRUMENT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165284
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOMETRIC TESTING OF THE COPING WITH BREAST CANCER RISK INSTRUMENT
Author(s):
Lancaster, Diane
Author Details:
Diane Lancaster, RN, PhD, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Center for Excellence in Nursing Practice, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Abstract:
This study was designed to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Coping with Breast Cancer Risk (CBCR) instrument. The CBCR measures primary prevention and early detection coping strategies used by women with family histories of breast cancer. Women with a positive family history of breast cancer have a higher relative breast cancer risk than those without. Research pertinent to the coping behaviors of this "at risk" population has focused primarily on the early detection measures of breast self-exam, clinical breast exam, and mammography. Other problem or emotion focused coping behaviors related to breast cancer risk have received little attention. While there are instruments that measure general coping behaviors in response to illness threat, there are no known instruments that measure coping behaviors specific to dealing with perceived breast cancer risk. The CBCR is an 11 item self-report measure whose format was modeled after the Jalowiec Coping Scale. The CBCR is designed to assess the frequency of use and degree of perceived effectiveness of coping behaviors specific to breast cancer risk. Internal consistency reliabilities and content and construct validity of the CBCR were assessed using a sample of 209 women with family histories of breast cancer. Alpha coefficients for the CBCR's total use and effectiveness scales were .70 and .76 respectively. Principal components exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation revealed three conceptually relevant subscales: Dietary factors; Chemical agents; and Early detection measures. Overall, the 11 instrument items accounted for 52% of the variance in breast cancer threat coping behaviors. The CBCR is a succinct measure whose preliminary psychometrics have demonstrated the instrument’s potential for use by researchers and clinicians working with women at increased risk for breast cancer. However, the current study's sample demographics limit the generalizability of these findings. Additional work with more diverse samples is needed to facilitate further psychometric analysis and refinement of this promising instrument.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Michigan Chapter of the American Cancer Society and the Ross Nursing Resource Committee at Boston Medical Center.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOMETRIC TESTING OF THE COPING WITH BREAST CANCER RISK INSTRUMENTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLancaster, Dianeen_US
dc.author.detailsDiane Lancaster, RN, PhD, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Center for Excellence in Nursing Practice, Boston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165284-
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Coping with Breast Cancer Risk (CBCR) instrument. The CBCR measures primary prevention and early detection coping strategies used by women with family histories of breast cancer. Women with a positive family history of breast cancer have a higher relative breast cancer risk than those without. Research pertinent to the coping behaviors of this "at risk" population has focused primarily on the early detection measures of breast self-exam, clinical breast exam, and mammography. Other problem or emotion focused coping behaviors related to breast cancer risk have received little attention. While there are instruments that measure general coping behaviors in response to illness threat, there are no known instruments that measure coping behaviors specific to dealing with perceived breast cancer risk. The CBCR is an 11 item self-report measure whose format was modeled after the Jalowiec Coping Scale. The CBCR is designed to assess the frequency of use and degree of perceived effectiveness of coping behaviors specific to breast cancer risk. Internal consistency reliabilities and content and construct validity of the CBCR were assessed using a sample of 209 women with family histories of breast cancer. Alpha coefficients for the CBCR's total use and effectiveness scales were .70 and .76 respectively. Principal components exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation revealed three conceptually relevant subscales: Dietary factors; Chemical agents; and Early detection measures. Overall, the 11 instrument items accounted for 52% of the variance in breast cancer threat coping behaviors. The CBCR is a succinct measure whose preliminary psychometrics have demonstrated the instrument’s potential for use by researchers and clinicians working with women at increased risk for breast cancer. However, the current study's sample demographics limit the generalizability of these findings. Additional work with more diverse samples is needed to facilitate further psychometric analysis and refinement of this promising instrument.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:47Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Michigan Chapter of the American Cancer Society and the Ross Nursing Resource Committee at Boston Medical Center.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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