2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165285
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PREDICTORS OF SPOUSAL DEPRESSED MOOD IN WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER
Author(s):
Lewis, Frances; Fletcher, Kristin; Cochrane, Barbara
Author Details:
Frances Lewis, RN, MN, PhD, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; Kristin Fletcher, MS; Barbara Cochrane, RN, PhD
Abstract:
Spouses of women with breast cancer have comparable or greater psychosocial morbidity as the patient. Depressed mood, in particular, is known to negatively impact the spouse’s ability to support his wife but no one knows what predicts his depressed mood. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a multivariate predictive model of spousal depressed mood during the treatment phase of a wife with early stage breast cancer. Eight factors associated with spousal depressed mood were identified from published literature; most related to a stress framework or a relational model of illness adjustment. Factors were marital adjustment; wife’s depressed mood; concerns for wife’s well being; diminished access to activities of choice; altered sexual activity; job-related tension; alienation from medical team; low confidence to manage or protect the wife from the cancer; interpersonal disconnection from wife; and illness-related uncertainty. Spouses of women newly diagnosed with early stage breast cancer (n=206) completed valid and reliable questionnaires that measured the eight factors. Depressed mood was measured by the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) Scale. Specially trained nurses administered the questionnaires in the spouses' homes. Analyses proceeded in 3 phases: preparatory, model development, and model testing. In the preparatory phase, the sample was randomly divided into two statistically comparable samples and data inspected for sampling distributions, outliers, collinearity, and covariates. In both the model development and model testing phases, the hypothesized predictors of spousal mood were regressed onto CES-D, after controlling for covariates. Analyses involved two independent samples, 103 spouses each. Three factors predicted spousal depressed mood in both the model testing and development analyses: marital adjustment; concerns over the wife’s well being; and job-related tension. In addition, altered sexual activity and illness-related uncertainty predicted spousal depressed mood in the model development and testing phases, respectively. Results reveal that spouses suffered from depression related to every component of their interpersonal lives: their marriage and sexual connection to their wife, their job, their future, and their fear of losing their wife to the cancer. Future intervention research is needed to minimize these sources of spousal distress.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: National Cancer Institute, NIH.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePREDICTORS OF SPOUSAL DEPRESSED MOOD IN WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Francesen_US
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Kristinen_US
dc.contributor.authorCochrane, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsFrances Lewis, RN, MN, PhD, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; Kristin Fletcher, MS; Barbara Cochrane, RN, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165285-
dc.description.abstractSpouses of women with breast cancer have comparable or greater psychosocial morbidity as the patient. Depressed mood, in particular, is known to negatively impact the spouse’s ability to support his wife but no one knows what predicts his depressed mood. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a multivariate predictive model of spousal depressed mood during the treatment phase of a wife with early stage breast cancer. Eight factors associated with spousal depressed mood were identified from published literature; most related to a stress framework or a relational model of illness adjustment. Factors were marital adjustment; wife’s depressed mood; concerns for wife’s well being; diminished access to activities of choice; altered sexual activity; job-related tension; alienation from medical team; low confidence to manage or protect the wife from the cancer; interpersonal disconnection from wife; and illness-related uncertainty. Spouses of women newly diagnosed with early stage breast cancer (n=206) completed valid and reliable questionnaires that measured the eight factors. Depressed mood was measured by the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) Scale. Specially trained nurses administered the questionnaires in the spouses' homes. Analyses proceeded in 3 phases: preparatory, model development, and model testing. In the preparatory phase, the sample was randomly divided into two statistically comparable samples and data inspected for sampling distributions, outliers, collinearity, and covariates. In both the model development and model testing phases, the hypothesized predictors of spousal mood were regressed onto CES-D, after controlling for covariates. Analyses involved two independent samples, 103 spouses each. Three factors predicted spousal depressed mood in both the model testing and development analyses: marital adjustment; concerns over the wife’s well being; and job-related tension. In addition, altered sexual activity and illness-related uncertainty predicted spousal depressed mood in the model development and testing phases, respectively. Results reveal that spouses suffered from depression related to every component of their interpersonal lives: their marriage and sexual connection to their wife, their job, their future, and their fear of losing their wife to the cancer. Future intervention research is needed to minimize these sources of spousal distress.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:48Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: National Cancer Institute, NIH.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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