REVIEW OF INSTRUMENTS TO MEASURE PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165286
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
REVIEW OF INSTRUMENTS TO MEASURE PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH CANCER
Author(s):
Linder, Lauri
Author Details:
Lauri Linder, MS, ARNP, CPON, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
Abstract:
Approximately 9,000 children in the United States are diagnosed with cancer annually. As survival rates have improved, increased attention has been given to physical symptoms associated with the disease and its treatment. Identification and management of physical symptoms is consistent with the American Cancer Society's National Action Plan for Childhood Cancer. Measuring symptoms in children poses challenges because of variation in cognitive abilities within and across developmental stages. In contrast to adults, few studies have addressed physical symptoms in children with cancer. This review of the literature was conducted to evaluate existing measures of physical symptoms in children and adolescents with cancer. Objectives were: 1) identify instruments developed for measuring physical symptoms in children with cancer, 2) describe the reliability and validity of these tools, and 3) assess developmental appropriateness of the tools. The review was based on a search of the electronic databases Medline, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and PsychLit from January 1988 through October 2003. Inclusion criteria were: articles published in peer-reviewed journals in English, those including a tool developed for use in children and adolescents with cancer, and tools in which physical symptoms comprised a portion of the total measure. Dissertations, unpublished papers, abstracts and qualitative studies were excluded. A coding sheet was developed to assess study purpose, sample size and characteristics, conceptualization and measurement of the symptom, respondent, and respondent burden. Reported measures of reliability and validity also were identified. Nineteen studies met criteria for review and 17 instruments were identified. Five studies reported measures of single symptoms, and 9 studies reported measures of multiple symptoms. Five studies reported symptoms as a component of quality-of-life measures. Symptom measures included child self-report, parent proxy-report, staff-report, and direct observation of symptoms. Most instruments reported acceptable internal consistency reliability. Validity most often was evaluated through correlation of findings with tools measuring similar constructs; most instruments demonstrated acceptable validity. Study limitations included small sample sizes and cross-sectional samples. Application of tools most often was limited to one study. Areas for future research include application of these measures in specific populations, intervention-based studies, and outcome-focused studies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleREVIEW OF INSTRUMENTS TO MEASURE PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLinder, Laurien_US
dc.author.detailsLauri Linder, MS, ARNP, CPON, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165286-
dc.description.abstractApproximately 9,000 children in the United States are diagnosed with cancer annually. As survival rates have improved, increased attention has been given to physical symptoms associated with the disease and its treatment. Identification and management of physical symptoms is consistent with the American Cancer Society's National Action Plan for Childhood Cancer. Measuring symptoms in children poses challenges because of variation in cognitive abilities within and across developmental stages. In contrast to adults, few studies have addressed physical symptoms in children with cancer. This review of the literature was conducted to evaluate existing measures of physical symptoms in children and adolescents with cancer. Objectives were: 1) identify instruments developed for measuring physical symptoms in children with cancer, 2) describe the reliability and validity of these tools, and 3) assess developmental appropriateness of the tools. The review was based on a search of the electronic databases Medline, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and PsychLit from January 1988 through October 2003. Inclusion criteria were: articles published in peer-reviewed journals in English, those including a tool developed for use in children and adolescents with cancer, and tools in which physical symptoms comprised a portion of the total measure. Dissertations, unpublished papers, abstracts and qualitative studies were excluded. A coding sheet was developed to assess study purpose, sample size and characteristics, conceptualization and measurement of the symptom, respondent, and respondent burden. Reported measures of reliability and validity also were identified. Nineteen studies met criteria for review and 17 instruments were identified. Five studies reported measures of single symptoms, and 9 studies reported measures of multiple symptoms. Five studies reported symptoms as a component of quality-of-life measures. Symptom measures included child self-report, parent proxy-report, staff-report, and direct observation of symptoms. Most instruments reported acceptable internal consistency reliability. Validity most often was evaluated through correlation of findings with tools measuring similar constructs; most instruments demonstrated acceptable validity. Study limitations included small sample sizes and cross-sectional samples. Application of tools most often was limited to one study. Areas for future research include application of these measures in specific populations, intervention-based studies, and outcome-focused studies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:49Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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