2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165287
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PRETREATMENT PREDICTORS OF POST PROSTATE CANCER TREATMENT FATIGUE
Author(s):
Maliski, Sally; Kwan, Lorna; Saigal, Christopher; Orecklin, James; Litwin, Mark S.
Author Details:
Sally Maliski, PhD, RN, UCLA, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, California, USA; Lorna Kwan, MPH; Christopher Saigal, MD, MPH; James Orecklin, MD; Mark S. Litwin, MD, MPH
Abstract:
Oncology nurses must assess and manage cancer-related fatigue. Our results suggest that nurses can identify and intervene with men at risk for fatigue prior to cancer treatment. We proposed to investigate fatigue among men with prostate cancer by treatment, demographics, and pretreatment general and disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and to describe baseline characteristics of men fatigued after treatment. Cancer-related fatigue, a debilitating tiredness or loss of energy, is subjective and multifactorial. With prostate cancer, fatigue is negatively associated with HRQOL. While HRQOL related to prostate cancer is extensively studied, little exists on pretreatment HRQOL and post-treatment fatigue, even though baseline factors are acknowledged as important to outcomes. Secondary analysis used data collected from 1 private and 2 public facilities. HRQOL questionnaires were completed at biopsy, and 6-12 months post-biopsy. Sociodemographics, comorbidities, PSA, biopsy results, Gleason sum, and treatment were obtained. UCLA Prostate Cancer Index (PCI), a validated instrument, measured prostate-specific HRQOL. The validated RAND 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) measured HRQOL. The SF-36 energy subscale measured fatigue. From 999 records, 149 with a positive biopsy and HRQOL scores at both time points were analyzed. Follow-up fatigue scores 10 points (1/2 SD) below baseline were categorized “declined” and fatigue scores of 50 or below as “fatigued”. Demographic, treatment, SF-36 and PCI differences between “not declined” and “declined” were analyzed univariately. Variables significant at p=0.2 entered into logistic regression. This was repeated for the second outcome, “fatigued”. Those “fatigued” entered treatment significantly lower in all HRQOL and PCI domains and were more likely to be treated at a public facility, African American, Latino or Asian, unmarried, not employed, and have comorbidities. Those “declined” were more likely to be treated at a public facility, have lower baseline fatigue scores, and PSA over 10. Controlling for treatment, lower baseline role-emotional scores predicted both being “fatigued” and “declined”. Other baseline predictors of being “fatigued” were radiation, treatment in a public facility, abnormal DRE, and PSA above 10. This highlights the importance of pretreatment factors in identifying men at risk for fatigue suggesting that interventions can be initiated before treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePRETREATMENT PREDICTORS OF POST PROSTATE CANCER TREATMENT FATIGUEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaliski, Sallyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwan, Lornaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaigal, Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.authorOrecklin, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorLitwin, Mark S.en_US
dc.author.detailsSally Maliski, PhD, RN, UCLA, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, California, USA; Lorna Kwan, MPH; Christopher Saigal, MD, MPH; James Orecklin, MD; Mark S. Litwin, MD, MPHen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165287-
dc.description.abstractOncology nurses must assess and manage cancer-related fatigue. Our results suggest that nurses can identify and intervene with men at risk for fatigue prior to cancer treatment. We proposed to investigate fatigue among men with prostate cancer by treatment, demographics, and pretreatment general and disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and to describe baseline characteristics of men fatigued after treatment. Cancer-related fatigue, a debilitating tiredness or loss of energy, is subjective and multifactorial. With prostate cancer, fatigue is negatively associated with HRQOL. While HRQOL related to prostate cancer is extensively studied, little exists on pretreatment HRQOL and post-treatment fatigue, even though baseline factors are acknowledged as important to outcomes. Secondary analysis used data collected from 1 private and 2 public facilities. HRQOL questionnaires were completed at biopsy, and 6-12 months post-biopsy. Sociodemographics, comorbidities, PSA, biopsy results, Gleason sum, and treatment were obtained. UCLA Prostate Cancer Index (PCI), a validated instrument, measured prostate-specific HRQOL. The validated RAND 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) measured HRQOL. The SF-36 energy subscale measured fatigue. From 999 records, 149 with a positive biopsy and HRQOL scores at both time points were analyzed. Follow-up fatigue scores 10 points (1/2 SD) below baseline were categorized “declined” and fatigue scores of 50 or below as “fatigued”. Demographic, treatment, SF-36 and PCI differences between “not declined” and “declined” were analyzed univariately. Variables significant at p=0.2 entered into logistic regression. This was repeated for the second outcome, “fatigued”. Those “fatigued” entered treatment significantly lower in all HRQOL and PCI domains and were more likely to be treated at a public facility, African American, Latino or Asian, unmarried, not employed, and have comorbidities. Those “declined” were more likely to be treated at a public facility, have lower baseline fatigue scores, and PSA over 10. Controlling for treatment, lower baseline role-emotional scores predicted both being “fatigued” and “declined”. Other baseline predictors of being “fatigued” were radiation, treatment in a public facility, abnormal DRE, and PSA above 10. This highlights the importance of pretreatment factors in identifying men at risk for fatigue suggesting that interventions can be initiated before treatment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:50Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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