RELATIONSHIP OF DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS TO PHYSICAL FUNCTION IN SURVIVORS OF CERVICAL CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165289
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
RELATIONSHIP OF DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS TO PHYSICAL FUNCTION IN SURVIVORS OF CERVICAL CANCER
Author(s):
McCorkle, Ruth; Greenwald, Howard; Lavery, Mary; Lev, Elise Lev; Clemmens, Donna
Author Details:
Ruth McCorkle, PhD, RN, FAAN, University School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA; Howard Greenwald, PhD; Mary Lavery, MSN, RN; Elise Lev, PhD, RN; Donna Clemmens, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Cervical cancer is highly curable, yet it is still quite prevalent. It is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, with some 10,520 new cases diagnosed in the United States each year. When diagnosed and treated early, cervical cancer is associated with minimal disruption to womens’ lives and with excellent chances of long-term survival. Past research has focused on short-term survival, but little is known about the effects of living with the long-term consequences of cervical cancer and its treatment. The purpose of the study was to describe the persistence of disease and treatment sequelae related to quality of life outcomes, including physical, psychological, social, and spiritual dimensions. This study was designed as a population-based survey of women diagnosed with cervical cancer in the State of Connecticut using Padilla and Grant’s Quality of Life framework. The study required that the Connecticut Tumor Registry (CTR) identify women who were diagnosed with cervical cancer as their primary disease between 1975 and 1995, had survived up to the present time, could be contacted via letter or telephone, and were able and willing to complete a telephone interview. The physician of record was contacted to provide clearance to contact their patient(s). The primary data collection instrument was a survey questionnaire and included the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS-36) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depressive Scale (CES-D). Descriptive and correlational analyses were conducted. The CTR contained 793 women diagnosed with cervical cancer and 208 women consented and completed the telephone survey. The sample ranged in ages from 29 to 90 years, 90% had completed high school, 65% were married, and 65% perceived their health status as excellent or very good. Depressive symptom scores were dichotomized as low or high based on the clinical cutpoint of 16. Overall, 97 women (47%) reported higher depressive symptoms, and younger women were more likely to be depressed (p = .01). Depressive symptoms were highly correlated with declines in physical function (p = .34). Results indicate that more attention to the psychological needs of long-term survivors of cervical cancer may be indicated.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: National Cancer Institute, SEER Special Studies.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRELATIONSHIP OF DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS TO PHYSICAL FUNCTION IN SURVIVORS OF CERVICAL CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcCorkle, Ruthen_US
dc.contributor.authorGreenwald, Howarden_US
dc.contributor.authorLavery, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorLev, Elise Leven_US
dc.contributor.authorClemmens, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsRuth McCorkle, PhD, RN, FAAN, University School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA; Howard Greenwald, PhD; Mary Lavery, MSN, RN; Elise Lev, PhD, RN; Donna Clemmens, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165289-
dc.description.abstractCervical cancer is highly curable, yet it is still quite prevalent. It is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, with some 10,520 new cases diagnosed in the United States each year. When diagnosed and treated early, cervical cancer is associated with minimal disruption to womens’ lives and with excellent chances of long-term survival. Past research has focused on short-term survival, but little is known about the effects of living with the long-term consequences of cervical cancer and its treatment. The purpose of the study was to describe the persistence of disease and treatment sequelae related to quality of life outcomes, including physical, psychological, social, and spiritual dimensions. This study was designed as a population-based survey of women diagnosed with cervical cancer in the State of Connecticut using Padilla and Grant’s Quality of Life framework. The study required that the Connecticut Tumor Registry (CTR) identify women who were diagnosed with cervical cancer as their primary disease between 1975 and 1995, had survived up to the present time, could be contacted via letter or telephone, and were able and willing to complete a telephone interview. The physician of record was contacted to provide clearance to contact their patient(s). The primary data collection instrument was a survey questionnaire and included the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS-36) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depressive Scale (CES-D). Descriptive and correlational analyses were conducted. The CTR contained 793 women diagnosed with cervical cancer and 208 women consented and completed the telephone survey. The sample ranged in ages from 29 to 90 years, 90% had completed high school, 65% were married, and 65% perceived their health status as excellent or very good. Depressive symptom scores were dichotomized as low or high based on the clinical cutpoint of 16. Overall, 97 women (47%) reported higher depressive symptoms, and younger women were more likely to be depressed (p = .01). Depressive symptoms were highly correlated with declines in physical function (p = .34). Results indicate that more attention to the psychological needs of long-term survivors of cervical cancer may be indicated.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:53Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: National Cancer Institute, SEER Special Studies.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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