PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL ISSUES IN ELDERLY CAREGIVERS DURING THE FIRST MONTH AFTER THEIR DYING RELATIVES ARE ADMITTED TO A HOME HOSPICE PROGRAM

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165290
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL ISSUES IN ELDERLY CAREGIVERS DURING THE FIRST MONTH AFTER THEIR DYING RELATIVES ARE ADMITTED TO A HOME HOSPICE PROGRAM
Author(s):
McGuire, Deborah; Straton, Joseph B.; Barg, Frances K.
Author Details:
Deborah McGuire, PhD, RN, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Joseph B. Straton, MD, MSCE; Frances K. Barg, PhD
Abstract:
Caring for a dying relative in home hospice poses multiple challenges for caregivers, particularly if they are elderly and frail. Extant research addresses caregiver burden, but more knowledge is needed about specific physical and psychosocial issues to initiate targeted interventions. The purpose of this study was to describe the physician and psychosocial issues reported by elderly caregivers in the first month after their dying relatives are admitted to home hospice. A quality of life conceptual framework guided this study. The study was a secondary analysis of data collected within an intervention study to improve caregivers' general physical and emotional status. The sample was 48 elderly (>65) caregivers whose dying relatives were admitted to the setting of a university-affiliated hospice's home care program in the northeastern US. Instruments included the reliable and valid Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CES-D), Caregiver Quality of Life Index (CQLI), and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12 (SF12); and a Participant Profile Form (PPF) for demographic and health related data. Measurement points were at admission (all instruments), and 2 and 4 weeks later (CQLI, SF12, & PPF). Preliminary analyses are presented below, and ongoing analyses are examining correlates of physical and psychosocial issues. Just over half (51%) of the caregivers were >75 years old, 70% were female, 35% were African American, 78% were spouses of patients, and 51% were caregivers for >6 months. At admission, 54% exhibited clinical depression (>16 on CES-D); reported low quality of life on CQLI emotional, social, financial, and physical domains; and had impaired physical and mental health, and social functioning (SF12). At all points, a majority reported numerous conditions that interfered with caregiving, including impaired sleep and appetite, fatigue, musculoskeletal problems, cardiovascular problems, and medication side effects. These findings reveal that elderly caregivers have multiple physical and psychosocial issues during the first month after admission and would likely benefit from targeted interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: The Pew Charitable Trusts.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePHYSICAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL ISSUES IN ELDERLY CAREGIVERS DURING THE FIRST MONTH AFTER THEIR DYING RELATIVES ARE ADMITTED TO A HOME HOSPICE PROGRAMen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorStraton, Joseph B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarg, Frances K.en_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah McGuire, PhD, RN, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Joseph B. Straton, MD, MSCE; Frances K. Barg, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165290-
dc.description.abstractCaring for a dying relative in home hospice poses multiple challenges for caregivers, particularly if they are elderly and frail. Extant research addresses caregiver burden, but more knowledge is needed about specific physical and psychosocial issues to initiate targeted interventions. The purpose of this study was to describe the physician and psychosocial issues reported by elderly caregivers in the first month after their dying relatives are admitted to home hospice. A quality of life conceptual framework guided this study. The study was a secondary analysis of data collected within an intervention study to improve caregivers' general physical and emotional status. The sample was 48 elderly (>65) caregivers whose dying relatives were admitted to the setting of a university-affiliated hospice's home care program in the northeastern US. Instruments included the reliable and valid Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CES-D), Caregiver Quality of Life Index (CQLI), and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12 (SF12); and a Participant Profile Form (PPF) for demographic and health related data. Measurement points were at admission (all instruments), and 2 and 4 weeks later (CQLI, SF12, & PPF). Preliminary analyses are presented below, and ongoing analyses are examining correlates of physical and psychosocial issues. Just over half (51%) of the caregivers were >75 years old, 70% were female, 35% were African American, 78% were spouses of patients, and 51% were caregivers for >6 months. At admission, 54% exhibited clinical depression (>16 on CES-D); reported low quality of life on CQLI emotional, social, financial, and physical domains; and had impaired physical and mental health, and social functioning (SF12). At all points, a majority reported numerous conditions that interfered with caregiving, including impaired sleep and appetite, fatigue, musculoskeletal problems, cardiovascular problems, and medication side effects. These findings reveal that elderly caregivers have multiple physical and psychosocial issues during the first month after admission and would likely benefit from targeted interventions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:54Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: The Pew Charitable Trusts.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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