FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH FEAR OF RECURRENCE IN CANCER SURVIVORS AND THEIR FAMILY CAREGIVERS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165292
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH FEAR OF RECURRENCE IN CANCER SURVIVORS AND THEIR FAMILY CAREGIVERS
Author(s):
Mellon, Suzanne; Northouse, Laurel; Kershaw, Trace; Freeman-Gibb, Laurie
Author Details:
Suzanne Mellon, PhD, RN, University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, Michigan, USA; Laurel Northouse, PhD, RN, FAAN; Trace Kershaw, PhD; Laurie Freeman-Gibb, RN, MSN
Abstract:
Although fear of cancer recurrence is one of the greatest concerns among survivors and their families, few studies have examined fear of recurrence or factors associated with it. This information is essential in order to help survivors and caregivers find ways to manage this pervasive fear and maintain their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between personal, social, and illness-related factors, appraisal, and fear of recurrence in survivors and their family caregivers. Personal factors included demographics such as age, gender, education, income, and other concurrent family stressors. Social factors included family hardiness and social support. Illness-related factors included time since diagnosis, type of cancer, and other health problems. Appraisal addressed the family’s meaning of the illness. A stress-coping framework, adapted from McCubbin and McCubbin's model, guided the study. Secondary analysis of data obtained in a large population-based exploratory study of survivors and their family caregivers was used to meet study aims. Cancer survivors, stratified by race (Caucasian and African American) and cancer site (breast, colon, uterine, and prostate) were randomly selected from the NCI SEER Cancer Registry in southeastern Michigan. The resulting sample consisted of 123 survivor and family caregiver dyads; 62 dyads were Caucasian and 61 dyads were African-American. Standardized instruments with adequate reliability and validity were used to measure study variables: Family Pressures Index, Family Hardiness Index, Social Support Index, Constructed Meaning Scale, and Fear of Recurrence Questionnaire. ANOVA and multiple regression were used to analyze the data. Study variables accounted for 41.8% of the variance in survivors’ and 26.6% of the variance in caregivers’ fear of recurrence. Survivors who were younger, had more family stress, less meaning associated with the illness, and fewer other health problems reported more fear. Caregivers who were Caucasian, had more family stress, less meaning, and fewer other health problems also had more fear. Implications suggest a profile of factors that puts participants at risk of having more fear of recurrence during survivorship. These factors need to be addressed in programs of care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH FEAR OF RECURRENCE IN CANCER SURVIVORS AND THEIR FAMILY CAREGIVERSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMellon, Suzanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorNorthouse, Laurelen_US
dc.contributor.authorKershaw, Traceen_US
dc.contributor.authorFreeman-Gibb, Laurieen_US
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Mellon, PhD, RN, University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, Michigan, USA; Laurel Northouse, PhD, RN, FAAN; Trace Kershaw, PhD; Laurie Freeman-Gibb, RN, MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165292-
dc.description.abstractAlthough fear of cancer recurrence is one of the greatest concerns among survivors and their families, few studies have examined fear of recurrence or factors associated with it. This information is essential in order to help survivors and caregivers find ways to manage this pervasive fear and maintain their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between personal, social, and illness-related factors, appraisal, and fear of recurrence in survivors and their family caregivers. Personal factors included demographics such as age, gender, education, income, and other concurrent family stressors. Social factors included family hardiness and social support. Illness-related factors included time since diagnosis, type of cancer, and other health problems. Appraisal addressed the family’s meaning of the illness. A stress-coping framework, adapted from McCubbin and McCubbin's model, guided the study. Secondary analysis of data obtained in a large population-based exploratory study of survivors and their family caregivers was used to meet study aims. Cancer survivors, stratified by race (Caucasian and African American) and cancer site (breast, colon, uterine, and prostate) were randomly selected from the NCI SEER Cancer Registry in southeastern Michigan. The resulting sample consisted of 123 survivor and family caregiver dyads; 62 dyads were Caucasian and 61 dyads were African-American. Standardized instruments with adequate reliability and validity were used to measure study variables: Family Pressures Index, Family Hardiness Index, Social Support Index, Constructed Meaning Scale, and Fear of Recurrence Questionnaire. ANOVA and multiple regression were used to analyze the data. Study variables accounted for 41.8% of the variance in survivors’ and 26.6% of the variance in caregivers’ fear of recurrence. Survivors who were younger, had more family stress, less meaning associated with the illness, and fewer other health problems reported more fear. Caregivers who were Caucasian, had more family stress, less meaning, and fewer other health problems also had more fear. Implications suggest a profile of factors that puts participants at risk of having more fear of recurrence during survivorship. These factors need to be addressed in programs of care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:56Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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