2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165295
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CURRICULUM SURVEY OF CANCER-RELATED CONTENT IN SIX SCHOOLS OF NURSING
Author(s):
Mundt, Mary; Conner, April; Hermann, Carla
Author Details:
Mary Mundt, PhD, RN, University of Louisville, Louiseville, Kentucky, USA; April Conner, MSSW; Carla Hermann, PhD, RN
Abstract:
The incidence and prevalence of cancer and the increase in cancer survivors means that nurses will encounter persons with cancer-related health concerns in all areas of practice. Nursing curricula should include cancer-related content to assure broad based knowledge in cancer nursing. The Center for Cancer Nursing Education and Research (CCNER) at the University of Louisville is implementing a community-wide intervention to improve cancer nursing education in six schools of nursing. The purpose of the study was to document all cancer-related content in nursing curricula in the participating schools of nursing. The aim was to develop a baseline for future curriculum enhancements. The framework of the study was educational communication as a statement of value and emphasis as represented in written curriculum materials. Course syllabi constitute a fundamental form of academic communication. The unit of analysis was each nursing course as documented in the course syllabi. Each school identified a primary faculty member as liaison to the study. The group defined cancer-related content and developed a data collection instrument. Data collection occurred in two phases. In Phase I course syllabi were reviewed by the faculty contact. Cancer-related content was documented along with descriptive variables about time allocated and learning variables. In Phase II the course coordinator validated Phase I data and added content that was not observable in the syllabus. This method assured accuracy and full documentation of cancer content. Each school submitted Phase I and Phase II data to the CCNER where it was coded according to the ONS Standards of Care and Professional Performance, adding additional codes as they emerged. A total of 138 courses were analyzed and 49% were found to have cancer-related content. The findings indicate the most frequent cancer-related topics were in the category of "Background Knowledge" (69%), with 31% of the content topics related to the ONS standards. Coverage of cancer-related content in nursing curricula was sporadic and there was no identifiable organizing framework. Recommendations are made for including cancer- related content in the nursing curriculum as a means of communicating the importance and significance of this common health problem.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Dept. of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCURRICULUM SURVEY OF CANCER-RELATED CONTENT IN SIX SCHOOLS OF NURSINGen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMundt, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorConner, Aprilen_US
dc.contributor.authorHermann, Carlaen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Mundt, PhD, RN, University of Louisville, Louiseville, Kentucky, USA; April Conner, MSSW; Carla Hermann, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165295-
dc.description.abstractThe incidence and prevalence of cancer and the increase in cancer survivors means that nurses will encounter persons with cancer-related health concerns in all areas of practice. Nursing curricula should include cancer-related content to assure broad based knowledge in cancer nursing. The Center for Cancer Nursing Education and Research (CCNER) at the University of Louisville is implementing a community-wide intervention to improve cancer nursing education in six schools of nursing. The purpose of the study was to document all cancer-related content in nursing curricula in the participating schools of nursing. The aim was to develop a baseline for future curriculum enhancements. The framework of the study was educational communication as a statement of value and emphasis as represented in written curriculum materials. Course syllabi constitute a fundamental form of academic communication. The unit of analysis was each nursing course as documented in the course syllabi. Each school identified a primary faculty member as liaison to the study. The group defined cancer-related content and developed a data collection instrument. Data collection occurred in two phases. In Phase I course syllabi were reviewed by the faculty contact. Cancer-related content was documented along with descriptive variables about time allocated and learning variables. In Phase II the course coordinator validated Phase I data and added content that was not observable in the syllabus. This method assured accuracy and full documentation of cancer content. Each school submitted Phase I and Phase II data to the CCNER where it was coded according to the ONS Standards of Care and Professional Performance, adding additional codes as they emerged. A total of 138 courses were analyzed and 49% were found to have cancer-related content. The findings indicate the most frequent cancer-related topics were in the category of "Background Knowledge" (69%), with 31% of the content topics related to the ONS standards. Coverage of cancer-related content in nursing curricula was sporadic and there was no identifiable organizing framework. Recommendations are made for including cancer- related content in the nursing curriculum as a means of communicating the importance and significance of this common health problem.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:15:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:15:59Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Dept. of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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