TESTING USABILITY OF A TAILORED INTERACTIVE HEALTH COMMUNICATION INTERVENTION TO INCREASE COLON CANCER SCREENING AMONG AFRICAN AMERICANS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165300
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
TESTING USABILITY OF A TAILORED INTERACTIVE HEALTH COMMUNICATION INTERVENTION TO INCREASE COLON CANCER SCREENING AMONG AFRICAN AMERICANS
Author(s):
Rawl, Susan; Champion, Victoria; Scott, Linda; Cotton, Tschannette; Weaver, Leslie; Overgaard, Amanda; Buchanan, Adam; Monahan, Patrick; Skinner, Celette Sugg
Author Details:
Susan Rawl, PhD, RN, Indiana University, School of Nursing, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA; Victoria Champion, RN, DNS, FAAN; Linda Scott, MS; Tschannette Cotton, MSW; Leslie Weaver, MSW; Amanda Overgaard, MPH; Adam Buchanan, MPH; Patrick Monahan, PhD; Celette Sugg Skinner, PhD
Abstract:
Colorectal cancer (CRC), when discovered early, is highly treatable. CRC screening has been shown to decrease incidence of CRC by 75% to 90% through identification and removal of precancerous polyps. Early diagnosis and treatment of CRC results in a survival rate greater than 90%. Promotion of screening among African Americans is needed. Both incidence and mortality rates are higher in African Americans than any other racial/ethnic group due, in part, to lower screening rates resulting in advanced stage disease at presentation. Prevention and earlier detection of CRC are needed to further reduce cancer deaths and disparities. The purpose of this study was to develop and test the usability of a tailored interactive health communication program designed to encourage CRC screening among African Americans. This theory-based interactive health communication intervention delivers messages that are individually tailored to each user’s perceived and objective risk for CRC, benefits and barriers to colorectal screening, self-efficacy, and stage of adoption for specific screening tests. Culturally-relevant constructs that were incorporated into the program include fatalism, religiosity, and time orientation. Usability testing was conducted with a convenience sample of 14 African Americans. Participants viewed the 25-minute program then immediately completed a self-administered survey to assess usability of the program software and hardware, appropriateness and comprehension of messages, visual appeal and clarity of graphics. User feedback also was collected through debriefing interviews conducted after completion of the survey. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and content analyses of qualitative data. All participants agreed or strongly agreed they learned a lot about: 1) how colorectal cancer develops, 2) colorectal cancer screening tests they should consider, and 3) their personal risk for developing the disease. All but one participant (93%) reported that the program: 1) made them think about getting a colon screening test; 2) would be useful to family and friends; 3) would be useful to people who do not know a lot about colon cancer; 4) was easy to use; and 5) was interesting. Valuable suggestions for improving the program were provided and will be used to guide revisions for future studies. Implications for researchers who are developing and testing health behavior interventions will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Conducted in affiliation with the Walther Cancer Institute, Indianapolis, Indiana.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTESTING USABILITY OF A TAILORED INTERACTIVE HEALTH COMMUNICATION INTERVENTION TO INCREASE COLON CANCER SCREENING AMONG AFRICAN AMERICANSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRawl, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorChampion, Victoriaen_US
dc.contributor.authorScott, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCotton, Tschannetteen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeaver, Leslieen_US
dc.contributor.authorOvergaard, Amandaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBuchanan, Adamen_US
dc.contributor.authorMonahan, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.authorSkinner, Celette Suggen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Rawl, PhD, RN, Indiana University, School of Nursing, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA; Victoria Champion, RN, DNS, FAAN; Linda Scott, MS; Tschannette Cotton, MSW; Leslie Weaver, MSW; Amanda Overgaard, MPH; Adam Buchanan, MPH; Patrick Monahan, PhD; Celette Sugg Skinner, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165300-
dc.description.abstractColorectal cancer (CRC), when discovered early, is highly treatable. CRC screening has been shown to decrease incidence of CRC by 75% to 90% through identification and removal of precancerous polyps. Early diagnosis and treatment of CRC results in a survival rate greater than 90%. Promotion of screening among African Americans is needed. Both incidence and mortality rates are higher in African Americans than any other racial/ethnic group due, in part, to lower screening rates resulting in advanced stage disease at presentation. Prevention and earlier detection of CRC are needed to further reduce cancer deaths and disparities. The purpose of this study was to develop and test the usability of a tailored interactive health communication program designed to encourage CRC screening among African Americans. This theory-based interactive health communication intervention delivers messages that are individually tailored to each user’s perceived and objective risk for CRC, benefits and barriers to colorectal screening, self-efficacy, and stage of adoption for specific screening tests. Culturally-relevant constructs that were incorporated into the program include fatalism, religiosity, and time orientation. Usability testing was conducted with a convenience sample of 14 African Americans. Participants viewed the 25-minute program then immediately completed a self-administered survey to assess usability of the program software and hardware, appropriateness and comprehension of messages, visual appeal and clarity of graphics. User feedback also was collected through debriefing interviews conducted after completion of the survey. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and content analyses of qualitative data. All participants agreed or strongly agreed they learned a lot about: 1) how colorectal cancer develops, 2) colorectal cancer screening tests they should consider, and 3) their personal risk for developing the disease. All but one participant (93%) reported that the program: 1) made them think about getting a colon screening test; 2) would be useful to family and friends; 3) would be useful to people who do not know a lot about colon cancer; 4) was easy to use; and 5) was interesting. Valuable suggestions for improving the program were provided and will be used to guide revisions for future studies. Implications for researchers who are developing and testing health behavior interventions will be presented.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:04Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Conducted in affiliation with the Walther Cancer Institute, Indianapolis, Indiana.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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