THE IMPACT OF BREAST CANCER ON THE FAMILY: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY OF FAMILIES WITH ADOLESCENTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165301
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE IMPACT OF BREAST CANCER ON THE FAMILY: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY OF FAMILIES WITH ADOLESCENTS
Author(s):
Rea, Gail
Author Details:
Gail Rea, RN, PhD, University of Missouri-St. Louise, School of Nursing, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
Abstract:
The impact of breast cancer is a major turning point in the woman's life and her family's. Despite the recognition that cancer is a family affair, most studies have focused either on the patient or on family members, and have overlooked the family as a whole. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to investigate the impact of breast cancer on the lived experience of families with adolescents, as perceived by the patient, spouse, and adolsecent, and the family unit. Family systems, family development, Rolland's illness-model, and Combrinck-Graham's family spiral model were the guiding theories for this study. Five families were interviewed. The women had been diagnosed with non-metastatic breast cancer and had completed their adjunctive therapy. Interviews with the patients, spouses, and adolescents and the family unit explored the research questions: What is the impact of breast cancer on the individual lived experience of the patient, spouse, and adolescent? What is the impact of breast cancer on the lived experience of families with adolescents? Data was analyzed using the phenomenological analysis methods of Giorgi, Schutz, and Patton. Trustworthiness was established by family members and two nurse researchers validating the descriptions of the themes. The data was also compared and triangulated with the literature. The themes identified from the patient interviews included gathering support, becoming self-focused, decision making, and expanding focus to family. The spouses themes included becoming focused, taking action, being protective, and sharing with others. Themes identified from the adolescent interviews: not knowing, changes of family roles, awareness of behavior, and altering plans. Themes unique to the family interviews included: anxious beginnings, spiritual experience, role of humor, and honor and celebration. Implications for further study during different phases of the illness and recovery. In addition, studied conducted during other phases of family development and those including in-laws and/or grandparents would be valuable. Nurses need to be aware of family life cycles and individual development processes are dynamic and occurring simultaneously when an illness such as breast cancer is introduced into the family. In order to assist families, nurses need to think in a systemic manner about these developmental processes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE IMPACT OF BREAST CANCER ON THE FAMILY: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY OF FAMILIES WITH ADOLESCENTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRea, Gailen_US
dc.author.detailsGail Rea, RN, PhD, University of Missouri-St. Louise, School of Nursing, St. Louis, Missouri, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165301-
dc.description.abstractThe impact of breast cancer is a major turning point in the woman's life and her family's. Despite the recognition that cancer is a family affair, most studies have focused either on the patient or on family members, and have overlooked the family as a whole. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to investigate the impact of breast cancer on the lived experience of families with adolescents, as perceived by the patient, spouse, and adolsecent, and the family unit. Family systems, family development, Rolland's illness-model, and Combrinck-Graham's family spiral model were the guiding theories for this study. Five families were interviewed. The women had been diagnosed with non-metastatic breast cancer and had completed their adjunctive therapy. Interviews with the patients, spouses, and adolescents and the family unit explored the research questions: What is the impact of breast cancer on the individual lived experience of the patient, spouse, and adolescent? What is the impact of breast cancer on the lived experience of families with adolescents? Data was analyzed using the phenomenological analysis methods of Giorgi, Schutz, and Patton. Trustworthiness was established by family members and two nurse researchers validating the descriptions of the themes. The data was also compared and triangulated with the literature. The themes identified from the patient interviews included gathering support, becoming self-focused, decision making, and expanding focus to family. The spouses themes included becoming focused, taking action, being protective, and sharing with others. Themes identified from the adolescent interviews: not knowing, changes of family roles, awareness of behavior, and altering plans. Themes unique to the family interviews included: anxious beginnings, spiritual experience, role of humor, and honor and celebration. Implications for further study during different phases of the illness and recovery. In addition, studied conducted during other phases of family development and those including in-laws and/or grandparents would be valuable. Nurses need to be aware of family life cycles and individual development processes are dynamic and occurring simultaneously when an illness such as breast cancer is introduced into the family. In order to assist families, nurses need to think in a systemic manner about these developmental processes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:05Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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