2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165307
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE UNCERTAINTY SCALE FOR KIDS: INSTRUMENT DEVELOPMENT AND PILOT TESTING
Author(s):
Stewart, Janet
Author Details:
Janet Stewart, PhD, RN, University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
Abstract:
Uncertainty is one of the primary challenges children with cancer face, but has not been systematically studied to date. Development of a psychometrically sound instrument to measure children’s uncertainty represents the first step in a planned program of research into uncertainty in children with cancer and its consequences for their psychological adjustment. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a child-centered instrument to measure uncertainty in the context of cancer treatment. The improvement in outcome for most children with cancer, resulting in large part from increasingly intensive treatments, has resulted in unpredictable illness trajectories with an unknown outcome for any individual child, creating a powerful paradox of increased optimism accompanied by enduring uncertainty. Children undergoing cancer treatment describe high levels of uncertainty, particularly during the early phases of diagnosis and treatment, characterized as not understanding, not knowing what will happen when, and not being sure what things mean (Stewart, 2003). Mishel’s (1988) Uncertainty in Illness theory provided the foundation for the conceptualization of uncertainty in children. The Uncertainty Scale for Kids (USK), consisting of 22 items utilizing a 4-point interval scale, was derived from qualitative interviews with children with cancer, evaluated for content validity by both clinical experts and child informants, and tested in an initial sample of 72 children aged 8 to 17 years (mean 13.0, sd 2.9) undergoing treatment for cancer. Reliability was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha, inter-item correlations, and one-week test-retest. Validity was evaluated by correlating uncertainty with anxiety and with depressive symptoms and by comparing uncertainty scores by intensity of treatment. The USK demonstrated adequate internal consistency (alpha = .94, inter-item r’s .30-.70) and stability (test-retest r = .64, p < .01). Scores on the USK were significantly correlated with children’s anxiety (r = .52, p < .001). Children undergoing more intensive treatment demonstrated significantly higher uncertainty scores (t69 = 3.08, p < .01). Therefore the USK appears psychometrically sound and offers promise for moving forward the study of children’s uncertainty and their adjustment to cancer treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Amgen, Inc.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE UNCERTAINTY SCALE FOR KIDS: INSTRUMENT DEVELOPMENT AND PILOT TESTINGen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Stewart, PhD, RN, University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165307-
dc.description.abstractUncertainty is one of the primary challenges children with cancer face, but has not been systematically studied to date. Development of a psychometrically sound instrument to measure children&rsquo;s uncertainty represents the first step in a planned program of research into uncertainty in children with cancer and its consequences for their psychological adjustment. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a child-centered instrument to measure uncertainty in the context of cancer treatment. The improvement in outcome for most children with cancer, resulting in large part from increasingly intensive treatments, has resulted in unpredictable illness trajectories with an unknown outcome for any individual child, creating a powerful paradox of increased optimism accompanied by enduring uncertainty. Children undergoing cancer treatment describe high levels of uncertainty, particularly during the early phases of diagnosis and treatment, characterized as not understanding, not knowing what will happen when, and not being sure what things mean (Stewart, 2003). Mishel&rsquo;s (1988) Uncertainty in Illness theory provided the foundation for the conceptualization of uncertainty in children. The Uncertainty Scale for Kids (USK), consisting of 22 items utilizing a 4-point interval scale, was derived from qualitative interviews with children with cancer, evaluated for content validity by both clinical experts and child informants, and tested in an initial sample of 72 children aged 8 to 17 years (mean 13.0, sd 2.9) undergoing treatment for cancer. Reliability was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha, inter-item correlations, and one-week test-retest. Validity was evaluated by correlating uncertainty with anxiety and with depressive symptoms and by comparing uncertainty scores by intensity of treatment. The USK demonstrated adequate internal consistency (alpha = .94, inter-item r&rsquo;s .30-.70) and stability (test-retest r = .64, p &lt; .01). Scores on the USK were significantly correlated with children&rsquo;s anxiety (r = .52, p &lt; .001). Children undergoing more intensive treatment demonstrated significantly higher uncertainty scores (t69 = 3.08, p &lt; .01). Therefore the USK appears psychometrically sound and offers promise for moving forward the study of children&rsquo;s uncertainty and their adjustment to cancer treatment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:11Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Amgen, Inc.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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