PROSPECTIVE STUDY COMPARING SIDE EFFECTS AND SATISFACTION WITH TREATMENTS FOR PROSTATE CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165309
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PROSPECTIVE STUDY COMPARING SIDE EFFECTS AND SATISFACTION WITH TREATMENTS FOR PROSTATE CANCER
Author(s):
Swenson, Karen; McPherson, Carol; Kjellberg, Janice
Author Details:
Karen Swenson, RN, MSN, AOCN, Park Nicollet Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA; Carol McPherson, MSW, MPH; Janice Kjellberg, RN
Abstract:
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, with approximately 230,110 new cases and 29,900 deaths annually in the US. Treatments for prostate cancer can cause side effects including impotence and urinary incontinence that can profoundly affect patients’ quality of life. Oncology nurses can improve patient’s satisfaction with treatment by assisting patients with treatment decision-making and helping them manage treatment-related side effects. The objective of this study is to compare patient-reported side effects and satisfaction with treatments for early stage prostate cancer at baseline (before definitive treatment), and at 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment. The study is based on a multidimensional QOL framework. 225 men with early stage prostate cancer were enrolled prospectively after diagnosis and before treatment, and followed for 24 months post-treatment. Patients completed the Prostate Cancer Treatment Outcome Questionnaire (PCTO-Q) at baseline, and at 6, 12, and 24 months post-treatment. The PCTO-Q has established reliability (Chronbach's alpha >.73) and validity. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate demographic information and satisfaction. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA), using baseline scores as covariates, was used to compare differences in PCTO-Q scores between the three main treatment groups (surgery, brachytherapy, and RT) over the three time periods. Age, baseline scores, and comorbidity were controlled for in the multivariate model. At 24 months, surgery patients experienced more urinary incontinence (63%) and sexual dysfunction (87%): radiation patients experienced more bowel difficulties (16%). Brachytherapy patients experienced significantly less bowel (11%) and sexual dysfunction (58%) at 24 months than either surgery or radiation therapy patients (p <.05). In the whole cohort at 24 months, 89% of men were partially/totally impotent, 22% experienced urinary incontinence, and 13% experienced bowel dysfunction. Men who had sexual dysfunction at 24 months expressed greater dissatisfaction with their treatment choice (P<.02). This study shows that although side effects diminish, many significant symptoms persist at 24 months after treatments. Treatment satisfaction was significantly reduced among men who experienced long-term side effects. Persistent symptoms, reduced treatment satisfaction and patient anticipation of realistic side effects have importance for nursing practice. Alteration in the content and focus of patient education should be considered.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Nycomed Amersham and Novartis Oncology.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePROSPECTIVE STUDY COMPARING SIDE EFFECTS AND SATISFACTION WITH TREATMENTS FOR PROSTATE CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSwenson, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcPherson, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.authorKjellberg, Janiceen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Swenson, RN, MSN, AOCN, Park Nicollet Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA; Carol McPherson, MSW, MPH; Janice Kjellberg, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165309-
dc.description.abstractProstate cancer is the most common cancer in men, with approximately 230,110 new cases and 29,900 deaths annually in the US. Treatments for prostate cancer can cause side effects including impotence and urinary incontinence that can profoundly affect patients&rsquo; quality of life. Oncology nurses can improve patient&rsquo;s satisfaction with treatment by assisting patients with treatment decision-making and helping them manage treatment-related side effects. The objective of this study is to compare patient-reported side effects and satisfaction with treatments for early stage prostate cancer at baseline (before definitive treatment), and at 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment. The study is based on a multidimensional QOL framework. 225 men with early stage prostate cancer were enrolled prospectively after diagnosis and before treatment, and followed for 24 months post-treatment. Patients completed the Prostate Cancer Treatment Outcome Questionnaire (PCTO-Q) at baseline, and at 6, 12, and 24 months post-treatment. The PCTO-Q has established reliability (Chronbach's alpha &gt;.73) and validity. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate demographic information and satisfaction. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA), using baseline scores as covariates, was used to compare differences in PCTO-Q scores between the three main treatment groups (surgery, brachytherapy, and RT) over the three time periods. Age, baseline scores, and comorbidity were controlled for in the multivariate model. At 24 months, surgery patients experienced more urinary incontinence (63%) and sexual dysfunction (87%): radiation patients experienced more bowel difficulties (16%). Brachytherapy patients experienced significantly less bowel (11%) and sexual dysfunction (58%) at 24 months than either surgery or radiation therapy patients (p &lt;.05). In the whole cohort at 24 months, 89% of men were partially/totally impotent, 22% experienced urinary incontinence, and 13% experienced bowel dysfunction. Men who had sexual dysfunction at 24 months expressed greater dissatisfaction with their treatment choice (P&lt;.02). This study shows that although side effects diminish, many significant symptoms persist at 24 months after treatments. Treatment satisfaction was significantly reduced among men who experienced long-term side effects. Persistent symptoms, reduced treatment satisfaction and patient anticipation of realistic side effects have importance for nursing practice. Alteration in the content and focus of patient education should be considered.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:13Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Nycomed Amersham and Novartis Oncology.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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