REVIEW AND CRITIQUE OF THE STATE OF THE SCIENCE: ADDRESSING CANCER AMONG AND BETWEEN U.S. ETHNIC/RACIAL MINORITY POPULATIONS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165310
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
REVIEW AND CRITIQUE OF THE STATE OF THE SCIENCE: ADDRESSING CANCER AMONG AND BETWEEN U.S. ETHNIC/RACIAL MINORITY POPULATIONS
Author(s):
Underwood, Sandra; Powe, Barbara; Canales, Mary
Author Details:
Sandra Underwood, RN, PhD, FAAN, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA; Barbara Powe, PhD, RN; Mary Canales, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Advances made in the area of cancer prevention and cancer control over the last two decades have led to declines in cancer incidence and mortality and increases in survival for many cancer patients. However, while the trends relative to cancer incidence, mortality and five-year survival for the Nation as a whole have significantly improved, data reveal that there are significant disparities in the degree to which the burden of cancer that remains is borne by racial/ethnic minority populations. As a practice-oriented discipline grounded in research, nursing could have a dominant role in efforts aimed toward eliminating the cancer disparities experienced by racial/ethnic minority population groups. Several reports of nursing studies have been published in the peer-reviewed literature that address factors associated with the cancer disparities experienced between and among U.S. racial/ethnic minority groups. However, given that few efforts have been undertaken to comprehensively review and critique this body of research, little is known about the scope, quality and potential impact of this body of nursing science. This presentation will present the results of the first comprehensive critiques of nursing research undertaken to address cancer related health disparities in ethnic/racial minority populations within the United States. The dimensions of the cancer care continuum, the dimensions of the continuum of research and the principles of evidence based practice were used as frameworks to guide this review and critique. The review and critique of 56 published nursing research reports addressing cancer in minority populations was conducted in four phases (selection of databases, selection of articles focused on cancer in minority populations, thematic sorting, review and critique) using the methods proposed by Cooper (1982). The findings revealed that this body of nursing research has contributed much to the identification and understanding of factors associated with the excess cancer morbidity and mortality of minority populations. However, in order for the profession to more fully contribute to the elimination of cancer related health disparities, data suggest the need to expand and strengthen this base of knowledge through the development of research methods and the conduct of intervention trials, population-based studies, and demonstration projects.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleREVIEW AND CRITIQUE OF THE STATE OF THE SCIENCE: ADDRESSING CANCER AMONG AND BETWEEN U.S. ETHNIC/RACIAL MINORITY POPULATIONSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorUnderwood, Sandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorPowe, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorCanales, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsSandra Underwood, RN, PhD, FAAN, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA; Barbara Powe, PhD, RN; Mary Canales, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165310-
dc.description.abstractAdvances made in the area of cancer prevention and cancer control over the last two decades have led to declines in cancer incidence and mortality and increases in survival for many cancer patients. However, while the trends relative to cancer incidence, mortality and five-year survival for the Nation as a whole have significantly improved, data reveal that there are significant disparities in the degree to which the burden of cancer that remains is borne by racial/ethnic minority populations. As a practice-oriented discipline grounded in research, nursing could have a dominant role in efforts aimed toward eliminating the cancer disparities experienced by racial/ethnic minority population groups. Several reports of nursing studies have been published in the peer-reviewed literature that address factors associated with the cancer disparities experienced between and among U.S. racial/ethnic minority groups. However, given that few efforts have been undertaken to comprehensively review and critique this body of research, little is known about the scope, quality and potential impact of this body of nursing science. This presentation will present the results of the first comprehensive critiques of nursing research undertaken to address cancer related health disparities in ethnic/racial minority populations within the United States. The dimensions of the cancer care continuum, the dimensions of the continuum of research and the principles of evidence based practice were used as frameworks to guide this review and critique. The review and critique of 56 published nursing research reports addressing cancer in minority populations was conducted in four phases (selection of databases, selection of articles focused on cancer in minority populations, thematic sorting, review and critique) using the methods proposed by Cooper (1982). The findings revealed that this body of nursing research has contributed much to the identification and understanding of factors associated with the excess cancer morbidity and mortality of minority populations. However, in order for the profession to more fully contribute to the elimination of cancer related health disparities, data suggest the need to expand and strengthen this base of knowledge through the development of research methods and the conduct of intervention trials, population-based studies, and demonstration projects.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:14Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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