2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165311
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE USE OF MUSIC THERAPY IN REDUCING SYMPTOMS OF RADIATION THERAPY
Author(s):
Wells, Nancy; Clark, Michael; Isaacs-Downton, Gloria; Redlin-Frasier, Sheryl; Eck, Carole
Author Details:
Nancy Wells, RN, DNSc, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Michael Clark, MME, MT-BC; Gloria Isaacs-Downton, BM, MTBC; Sheryl Redlin-Frasier, RN, ONC; Carole Eck, MBA, RN
Abstract:
Radiation therapy (RT) is a common treatment for many cancers. For curative RT, patients receive daily treatments for 3 to 7 weeks. These treatments are anxiety-provoking, and typically produce fatigue and pain. Developing effective interventions to relieve these responses may provide better treatment experiences and improve quality of life in patients receiving RT. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of music therapy, provided by a board-certified music therapist, on the emotional responses (anxiety, depression, treatment-related distress) and symptom activity (fatigue and pain) of patients undergoing curative RT. Music therapy may produce beneficial effects on emotions and symptoms through a number of mechanisms. Promotion of relaxation, entrainment, and distraction have been proposed as mechanisms. The literature suggests that music therapy is most effective when it incorporates the patient’s musical preferences and is delivered by a trained music therapist. A total of 63 patients were included in this randomized clinical trial; 35 received music therapy and 28 received usual care. The intervention consisted of a single 45 minute session with a music therapist to select preferred music, which was then developed into a patient-specific audiotape to be used throughout RT. Outcomes, measured with validated instruments, included anxiety and depression (HAD), treatment-related distress (NRS), fatigue (POMS), and pain (NRS). Measures were obtained at baseline, mid-treatment, and end of treatment for all variables except distress, which was collected weekly. Data were analyzed using a 2 (group) by 3(time) mixed model repeated measures ANOVA. The groups were equivalent on demographic and clinical variables. Anxiety and distress were significantly lower for the experimental participants when compared to the controls and declined over time for both groups. No significant differences between groups or over time were found for depression, fatigue, or pain. While these data suggest music therapy may be beneficial in relieving anxiety and distress during RT, a more intensive intervention is recommended to produce effects on symptom activity.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: American Music Therapy Association; Sigma Theta Tau Iota Chapter.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE USE OF MUSIC THERAPY IN REDUCING SYMPTOMS OF RADIATION THERAPYen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWells, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorIsaacs-Downton, Gloriaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRedlin-Frasier, Sherylen_US
dc.contributor.authorEck, Caroleen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Wells, RN, DNSc, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Michael Clark, MME, MT-BC; Gloria Isaacs-Downton, BM, MTBC; Sheryl Redlin-Frasier, RN, ONC; Carole Eck, MBA, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165311-
dc.description.abstractRadiation therapy (RT) is a common treatment for many cancers. For curative RT, patients receive daily treatments for 3 to 7 weeks. These treatments are anxiety-provoking, and typically produce fatigue and pain. Developing effective interventions to relieve these responses may provide better treatment experiences and improve quality of life in patients receiving RT. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of music therapy, provided by a board-certified music therapist, on the emotional responses (anxiety, depression, treatment-related distress) and symptom activity (fatigue and pain) of patients undergoing curative RT. Music therapy may produce beneficial effects on emotions and symptoms through a number of mechanisms. Promotion of relaxation, entrainment, and distraction have been proposed as mechanisms. The literature suggests that music therapy is most effective when it incorporates the patient’s musical preferences and is delivered by a trained music therapist. A total of 63 patients were included in this randomized clinical trial; 35 received music therapy and 28 received usual care. The intervention consisted of a single 45 minute session with a music therapist to select preferred music, which was then developed into a patient-specific audiotape to be used throughout RT. Outcomes, measured with validated instruments, included anxiety and depression (HAD), treatment-related distress (NRS), fatigue (POMS), and pain (NRS). Measures were obtained at baseline, mid-treatment, and end of treatment for all variables except distress, which was collected weekly. Data were analyzed using a 2 (group) by 3(time) mixed model repeated measures ANOVA. The groups were equivalent on demographic and clinical variables. Anxiety and distress were significantly lower for the experimental participants when compared to the controls and declined over time for both groups. No significant differences between groups or over time were found for depression, fatigue, or pain. While these data suggest music therapy may be beneficial in relieving anxiety and distress during RT, a more intensive intervention is recommended to produce effects on symptom activity.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:15Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: American Music Therapy Association; Sigma Theta Tau Iota Chapter.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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