PATTERNS OF CHANGE IN FATIGUE, ENERGY LEVELS, AND SLEEP PARAMETERS IN MEN UNDERGOING RADIATION THERAPY (RT) FOR PROSTATE CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165312
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PATTERNS OF CHANGE IN FATIGUE, ENERGY LEVELS, AND SLEEP PARAMETERS IN MEN UNDERGOING RADIATION THERAPY (RT) FOR PROSTATE CANCER
Author(s):
West, Claudia; Miaskowski, Christine; Lee, Kathryn; Dodd, Marylin; Paul, Steven; Wara, William; Swift, Patrick
Author Details:
Claudia West, RN, MS, University of California, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA; Christine Miaskowski, RN, PhD, FAAN; Kathryn Lee, RN, PhD, FAAN; Marylin Dodd, RN, PhD, FAAN; Steven Paul, PhD; William Wara, MD; Patrick Swift, MD
Abstract:
Fatigue is a common symptom reported by patients undergoing RT. Less is known about the pattern of sleep disturbance during RT. The purpose of this descriptive, longitudinal study was to evaluate for changes in fatigue, energy levels, and sleep parameters in men who underwent RT for prostate cancer. The UCSF Symptom Management Model served as the theoretical framework for this study. Patients were recruited from two RT departments prior to the initiation of therapy and assessments were done at baseline, as well as at the middle and the end of RT. At each assessment point, patients completed the Lee Fatigue Scale (LFS) in the mornings and in the evening, as well as the General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS). A total of 82 men with a mean age of 67.1 years, an average Karnofsky Performance Status Score of 95.6, and a Stage T1 or T2 prostate cancer were recruited for this study. A repeated measures ANOVA was done and determined that both morning and evening fatigue increased over time and were highest at the end of RT. At all assessments, evening fatigue was significantly higher than morning fatigue. Higher energy levels were reported in the morning compared to the evening. However, energy levels did not change over the three assessments. In contrast, significant differences were found in total GSDS scores from baseline to the middle of and at the end of RT. Men reported significant decrements in the quality of their sleep, significant increases in the quantity of their sleep, a longer sleep onset latency, as well as significant increases in the number of mid-sleep awakenings, the number of early morning awakenings, and an increase in excessive daytime sleepiness. All of these changes in sleep parameters reached a peak at the middle of RT and remained elevated at the end of RT. These findings suggest that the experience of RT for men with prostate cancer produces significant disruptions in sleep that are followed by increases in fatigue. The disruptions in sleep may be attributed to the increased frequency of urination during the course of RT.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: National Institute of Nursing Research and National Cancer Institute.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePATTERNS OF CHANGE IN FATIGUE, ENERGY LEVELS, AND SLEEP PARAMETERS IN MEN UNDERGOING RADIATION THERAPY (RT) FOR PROSTATE CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWest, Claudiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiaskowski, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Kathrynen_US
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Marylinen_US
dc.contributor.authorPaul, Stevenen_US
dc.contributor.authorWara, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorSwift, Patricken_US
dc.author.detailsClaudia West, RN, MS, University of California, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA; Christine Miaskowski, RN, PhD, FAAN; Kathryn Lee, RN, PhD, FAAN; Marylin Dodd, RN, PhD, FAAN; Steven Paul, PhD; William Wara, MD; Patrick Swift, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165312-
dc.description.abstractFatigue is a common symptom reported by patients undergoing RT. Less is known about the pattern of sleep disturbance during RT. The purpose of this descriptive, longitudinal study was to evaluate for changes in fatigue, energy levels, and sleep parameters in men who underwent RT for prostate cancer. The UCSF Symptom Management Model served as the theoretical framework for this study. Patients were recruited from two RT departments prior to the initiation of therapy and assessments were done at baseline, as well as at the middle and the end of RT. At each assessment point, patients completed the Lee Fatigue Scale (LFS) in the mornings and in the evening, as well as the General Sleep Disturbance Scale (GSDS). A total of 82 men with a mean age of 67.1 years, an average Karnofsky Performance Status Score of 95.6, and a Stage T1 or T2 prostate cancer were recruited for this study. A repeated measures ANOVA was done and determined that both morning and evening fatigue increased over time and were highest at the end of RT. At all assessments, evening fatigue was significantly higher than morning fatigue. Higher energy levels were reported in the morning compared to the evening. However, energy levels did not change over the three assessments. In contrast, significant differences were found in total GSDS scores from baseline to the middle of and at the end of RT. Men reported significant decrements in the quality of their sleep, significant increases in the quantity of their sleep, a longer sleep onset latency, as well as significant increases in the number of mid-sleep awakenings, the number of early morning awakenings, and an increase in excessive daytime sleepiness. All of these changes in sleep parameters reached a peak at the middle of RT and remained elevated at the end of RT. These findings suggest that the experience of RT for men with prostate cancer produces significant disruptions in sleep that are followed by increases in fatigue. The disruptions in sleep may be attributed to the increased frequency of urination during the course of RT.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:16Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: National Institute of Nursing Research and National Cancer Institute.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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