2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165315
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CONSIDERATIONS IN SCORING ACTIGRAPH RECORDINGS OF SLEEP AND WAKE ACTIVITIES
Author(s):
Young-McCaughan, Stacey; Mays, Mary Z.; Arzola, Sonya M.; Nowlin, Marilyn U.
Author Details:
Stacey Young-McCaughan, RN, PhD, AOCN, Colonel, US Army Nurse Corps, US Army Medical Command, Ft. Sam, Houston, Texas, USA; Mary Z. Mays, PhD; Sonya M. Arzola, BS; Marilyn U. Nowlin, RN, BS, BSN
Abstract:
To discuss considerations scoring actigraph recordings of sleep and wake activities. One instrument used to objectively assess sleep is the actigraph, a wrist-worn microcomputer that measures movement in three dimensions. Computerized actigraph algorithms for characterizing sleep periods and sleep stages correlate highly with electroencephalograph recordings. However, dramatic differences in measures can result depending upon how the actigrams are trimmed and scored. In a prospective, repeated measures study of 62 patients diagnosed with cancer within the previous two years, activity and rest patterns were assessed using a wrist actigraph. Ages of subjects ranged from 24 to 83 (mean = 59). Half of the participants were male and half were female. Participants had a wide range of cancer diagnoses and all stages of cancer. At the start of the study, the study team agreed upon scoring protocols to capture characteristics of both awake and sleep periods which were strictly adhered to during data analysis. Actigraphs were initiated to collect data in one-minute epochs for 72 hours. Actigrams were trimmed to a single 48-hour record beginning at 9:01 am on Wednesday and ending at 9:00 am on Friday. Each 48-hour record included two “up” (active) periods and two “down” (rest) periods. The actigrams were scored using the Cole-Kripke algorithm. Subjects slept an average of only 6.5 hours per night. However, their sleep was quite fragmented; average sleep episodes lasted less than 50 minutes, and they awakened 14 times per night on average. Thus, subjects spent an average of only 78% of the night asleep. Actigraph assessed measures of sleep and activity can vary depending upon the scoring protocols that are followed. If there were generally agreed upon scoring protocols, the results of studies and comparisons between studies could more easily be communicated. Nurse researchers are using wrist-worn actigraphs to assess sleep and wake activities of patients with cancer. Different researchers employ different methods to analyze the actigraph data. Open discussions of the strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches to analysis would advance this field of research.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: The Department of Defense Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences TriService Nursing Research Program, N98-051.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCONSIDERATIONS IN SCORING ACTIGRAPH RECORDINGS OF SLEEP AND WAKE ACTIVITIESen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYoung-McCaughan, Staceyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMays, Mary Z.en_US
dc.contributor.authorArzola, Sonya M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNowlin, Marilyn U.en_US
dc.author.detailsStacey Young-McCaughan, RN, PhD, AOCN, Colonel, US Army Nurse Corps, US Army Medical Command, Ft. Sam, Houston, Texas, USA; Mary Z. Mays, PhD; Sonya M. Arzola, BS; Marilyn U. Nowlin, RN, BS, BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165315-
dc.description.abstractTo discuss considerations scoring actigraph recordings of sleep and wake activities. One instrument used to objectively assess sleep is the actigraph, a wrist-worn microcomputer that measures movement in three dimensions. Computerized actigraph algorithms for characterizing sleep periods and sleep stages correlate highly with electroencephalograph recordings. However, dramatic differences in measures can result depending upon how the actigrams are trimmed and scored. In a prospective, repeated measures study of 62 patients diagnosed with cancer within the previous two years, activity and rest patterns were assessed using a wrist actigraph. Ages of subjects ranged from 24 to 83 (mean = 59). Half of the participants were male and half were female. Participants had a wide range of cancer diagnoses and all stages of cancer. At the start of the study, the study team agreed upon scoring protocols to capture characteristics of both awake and sleep periods which were strictly adhered to during data analysis. Actigraphs were initiated to collect data in one-minute epochs for 72 hours. Actigrams were trimmed to a single 48-hour record beginning at 9:01 am on Wednesday and ending at 9:00 am on Friday. Each 48-hour record included two “up” (active) periods and two “down” (rest) periods. The actigrams were scored using the Cole-Kripke algorithm. Subjects slept an average of only 6.5 hours per night. However, their sleep was quite fragmented; average sleep episodes lasted less than 50 minutes, and they awakened 14 times per night on average. Thus, subjects spent an average of only 78% of the night asleep. Actigraph assessed measures of sleep and activity can vary depending upon the scoring protocols that are followed. If there were generally agreed upon scoring protocols, the results of studies and comparisons between studies could more easily be communicated. Nurse researchers are using wrist-worn actigraphs to assess sleep and wake activities of patients with cancer. Different researchers employ different methods to analyze the actigraph data. Open discussions of the strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches to analysis would advance this field of research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:19Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: The Department of Defense Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences TriService Nursing Research Program, N98-051.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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