2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165316
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Indigenous Helpers for Smoking Cessation
Author(s):
Andersen, S.
Author Details:
S. Andersen, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, School of Nursing, Lubbock, Texas, USA
Abstract:
Smoking cessation is an area where nurses are uniquely equipped to provide information to patients in all settings. Nurses are educated to think holistically, and take into account the individual patient in her/his unique setting composed of family, occupation, community and internal and external environment. The latest Surgeon General's report advises all health care providers be involved at every visit to promote smoking cessation. As smoking is related to the top four causes of mortality in the U.S., it is important for nurses to mobilize our considerable influence on patient care to advocate for smoking cessation. Purpose: The research examined the question is there a difference in post intervention smoking behavior between smokers who have an indigenous helper compared with those who do not among adult FreshStart participants. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The Transtheoretical Model of behavior change (TTM) is often used as a framework for smoking cessation programs. This study examined whether the TTM was useful in research to predict smoking behavior. An intervention was based on the TTM construct "processes of change.” Helping relationships was the process of change selected as the intervention. An indigenous helper from the smoker's social network was designated by the intervention group participants. Methods: A two-group, two-time, five-week multi-site experimental design was used. The outcome variable, smoking behavior, was measured in two ways: point prevalence and forward movement along the stages of change. Participants (N=111) were recruited from five sites with regular FreshStart programs. Each one completed the Stage of Change Questionnaire, Processes of Change helping relationships subscale and Partner Interaction Questionnaire-20 at baseline and four weeks. Data Analysis: Logistic regressions and ANOVA were used in the analysis. Findings and Implications: The use of an indigenous helper did not predict smoking cessation, however, use of Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) and/or bupropion did. The findings did not support the use of the TTM process of change helping relationships to promote smoking cessation. The results do lend further support to the mounting literature supporting use of NRT/bupropion for smoking cessation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIndigenous Helpers for Smoking Cessationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAndersen, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsS. Andersen, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, School of Nursing, Lubbock, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165316-
dc.description.abstractSmoking cessation is an area where nurses are uniquely equipped to provide information to patients in all settings. Nurses are educated to think holistically, and take into account the individual patient in her/his unique setting composed of family, occupation, community and internal and external environment. The latest Surgeon General's report advises all health care providers be involved at every visit to promote smoking cessation. As smoking is related to the top four causes of mortality in the U.S., it is important for nurses to mobilize our considerable influence on patient care to advocate for smoking cessation. Purpose: The research examined the question is there a difference in post intervention smoking behavior between smokers who have an indigenous helper compared with those who do not among adult FreshStart participants. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The Transtheoretical Model of behavior change (TTM) is often used as a framework for smoking cessation programs. This study examined whether the TTM was useful in research to predict smoking behavior. An intervention was based on the TTM construct "processes of change.” Helping relationships was the process of change selected as the intervention. An indigenous helper from the smoker's social network was designated by the intervention group participants. Methods: A two-group, two-time, five-week multi-site experimental design was used. The outcome variable, smoking behavior, was measured in two ways: point prevalence and forward movement along the stages of change. Participants (N=111) were recruited from five sites with regular FreshStart programs. Each one completed the Stage of Change Questionnaire, Processes of Change helping relationships subscale and Partner Interaction Questionnaire-20 at baseline and four weeks. Data Analysis: Logistic regressions and ANOVA were used in the analysis. Findings and Implications: The use of an indigenous helper did not predict smoking cessation, however, use of Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) and/or bupropion did. The findings did not support the use of the TTM process of change helping relationships to promote smoking cessation. The results do lend further support to the mounting literature supporting use of NRT/bupropion for smoking cessation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:20Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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