2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165318
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patients' Perceptions of Chemotherapy Side Effects Burden
Author(s):
Barsevick, A.; Kim, H.J.; Dudley, W.
Author Details:
A. Barsevick, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Cheltenham, Pennsylvania, USA; H. J. Kim; W. Dudley
Abstract:
Individuals undergoing cancer treatment may experience multiple symptoms. Yet, most research has examined individual symptoms. Understanding the relationships among and the effect of symptom combinations is critical for better symptom management. Purpose: This secondary data analysis examined the clustering of three symptoms (fatigue, insomnia, and depression) and identified clinical/demographic antecedents and clinical consequences of clustered symptoms. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The updated Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms provided a conceptual framework for the analysis. Methods: Data were derived from a randomized clinical trial of a fatigue intervention during cancer treatment. The sample for this secondary analysis consisted of 282 breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Data were collected prior to treatment and at two follow-up points. For chemotherapy, follow-up data were collected 48 hours after the second and third chemotherapy treatments. For radiotherapy, follow-up points included the last week of treatment and four weeks after treatment ended. Measures of fatigue (General Fatigue Scale), insomnia (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), depression (Profile of Mood States Depression Scale), and usual functioning (Functional Performance Inventory) are valid and reliable measures. Data Analysis: Data analysis used correlation, t-tests, and multiple regression and analysis of variance. Findings and Implications: Fatigue, insomnia, and depression were moderately correlated at each data point. Performance status and other symptoms were antecedents and usual functioning was a consequence of each symptom at each data point. Controlling for performance status and other symptoms at each data point, the combined symptoms of interest accounted for 35% (baseline), 37% (follow-up 1), and 39% (follow-up 2) of the variance in usual functioning. These results indicate that even after accounting for other symptoms and functional status before treatment, the symptoms together predicted poorer functioning during cancer treatment. It is possible that treating cancer symptoms can help reduce or prevent functional decline. It may also be necessary to address directly the threat of functional decline. More research is needed to examine the nature of the relationship between and among specific symptoms during cancer therapy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatients' Perceptions of Chemotherapy Side Effects Burdenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarsevick, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, H.J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDudley, W.en_US
dc.author.detailsA. Barsevick, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Cheltenham, Pennsylvania, USA; H. J. Kim; W. Dudleyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165318-
dc.description.abstractIndividuals undergoing cancer treatment may experience multiple symptoms. Yet, most research has examined individual symptoms. Understanding the relationships among and the effect of symptom combinations is critical for better symptom management. Purpose: This secondary data analysis examined the clustering of three symptoms (fatigue, insomnia, and depression) and identified clinical/demographic antecedents and clinical consequences of clustered symptoms. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The updated Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms provided a conceptual framework for the analysis. Methods: Data were derived from a randomized clinical trial of a fatigue intervention during cancer treatment. The sample for this secondary analysis consisted of 282 breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Data were collected prior to treatment and at two follow-up points. For chemotherapy, follow-up data were collected 48 hours after the second and third chemotherapy treatments. For radiotherapy, follow-up points included the last week of treatment and four weeks after treatment ended. Measures of fatigue (General Fatigue Scale), insomnia (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), depression (Profile of Mood States Depression Scale), and usual functioning (Functional Performance Inventory) are valid and reliable measures. Data Analysis: Data analysis used correlation, t-tests, and multiple regression and analysis of variance. Findings and Implications: Fatigue, insomnia, and depression were moderately correlated at each data point. Performance status and other symptoms were antecedents and usual functioning was a consequence of each symptom at each data point. Controlling for performance status and other symptoms at each data point, the combined symptoms of interest accounted for 35% (baseline), 37% (follow-up 1), and 39% (follow-up 2) of the variance in usual functioning. These results indicate that even after accounting for other symptoms and functional status before treatment, the symptoms together predicted poorer functioning during cancer treatment. It is possible that treating cancer symptoms can help reduce or prevent functional decline. It may also be necessary to address directly the threat of functional decline. More research is needed to examine the nature of the relationship between and among specific symptoms during cancer therapy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:23Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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