Analyzing Ambulatory Oncology Nurses Telephone Mediated Decision Support: Facilitating Symptom Management Self-Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165320
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Analyzing Ambulatory Oncology Nurses Telephone Mediated Decision Support: Facilitating Symptom Management Self-Care
Author(s):
Bitonti, L.; O'Connor, A; Fitch, M; Bunn, H
Author Details:
L. Bitonti, The Ottawa Hospital, TOH Regional Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; A. O�Connor; M. Fitch; H. Bunn
Abstract:
Cancer patients today are receiving increasingly complex treatment protocols causing more severe toxicities than ever before. Resource constraints are forcing oncology nurses to re-evaluate didactic methods of patient education and care around disease management. This reconceptualization of nursing care emphasizes the need for patient education to more on motivating behaviour change. Purpose: Research shows that self-care symptom management programs involving face to face interactions with nurses are effective at minimizing/preventing serious side-effects from cancer therapy and improve patients’ self-care skills. As cancer treatment is increasingly being delivered in out-patient centres far from patients’ homes, patients phone oncology nurses seeking advice for treatment related side-effects. Little is known about how nurses in cancer centres support patients over the telephone to make self-care decisions. The purpose of this study was to develop, validate and evaluate a research tool to analyze oncology nurses’ provision of telephone mediated decision support to promote self-efficacy in symptom management self care to patients receiving breast cancer therapy. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: This two-phase study is guided by Self-Efficacy Theory (Bandura, 1986) and the Ottawa Decision Support Framework (O’Connor et al, 1998) to identify performance criteria for ambulatory oncology nurses providing telephone-mediated decision support to promote self-efficacy in symptom management self-care to patients receiving breast cancer therapy. Methods: In Phase I, the Symptom Management Telephone-Mediated Decision Support Analysis Tool (Bitonti & O’Connor, 2004) was adapted from the existing Decision Support Analysis Tool (Bunn, O’Connor, & Jacobsen, 2003) and reviewed by an expert panel. A Standardized Patient Program and Rater Training program were developed to support reliability and validity testing in the subsequent phase. In Phase II, nurses’ recorded interactions (n=40) with standardized cases were analyzed by two trained raters using the new tool. Data Analysis: Content validity was calculated using the interrater agreement and content validity index. Interrater reliability was established by analyzing the nurses’ verbal responses in each of the categories of decision support skill. Findings and Implications: This new tool can be used to train nurses less experienced in telephone mediated decision support and improve these skills in nurses who already provide cancer care over the telephone, in turn supporting patients to engage in self-care while at home.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnalyzing Ambulatory Oncology Nurses Telephone Mediated Decision Support: Facilitating Symptom Management Self-Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBitonti, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorFitch, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorBunn, Hen_US
dc.author.detailsL. Bitonti, The Ottawa Hospital, TOH Regional Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; A. O�Connor; M. Fitch; H. Bunnen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165320-
dc.description.abstractCancer patients today are receiving increasingly complex treatment protocols causing more severe toxicities than ever before. Resource constraints are forcing oncology nurses to re-evaluate didactic methods of patient education and care around disease management. This reconceptualization of nursing care emphasizes the need for patient education to more on motivating behaviour change. Purpose: Research shows that self-care symptom management programs involving face to face interactions with nurses are effective at minimizing/preventing serious side-effects from cancer therapy and improve patients’ self-care skills. As cancer treatment is increasingly being delivered in out-patient centres far from patients’ homes, patients phone oncology nurses seeking advice for treatment related side-effects. Little is known about how nurses in cancer centres support patients over the telephone to make self-care decisions. The purpose of this study was to develop, validate and evaluate a research tool to analyze oncology nurses’ provision of telephone mediated decision support to promote self-efficacy in symptom management self care to patients receiving breast cancer therapy. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: This two-phase study is guided by Self-Efficacy Theory (Bandura, 1986) and the Ottawa Decision Support Framework (O’Connor et al, 1998) to identify performance criteria for ambulatory oncology nurses providing telephone-mediated decision support to promote self-efficacy in symptom management self-care to patients receiving breast cancer therapy. Methods: In Phase I, the Symptom Management Telephone-Mediated Decision Support Analysis Tool (Bitonti & O’Connor, 2004) was adapted from the existing Decision Support Analysis Tool (Bunn, O’Connor, & Jacobsen, 2003) and reviewed by an expert panel. A Standardized Patient Program and Rater Training program were developed to support reliability and validity testing in the subsequent phase. In Phase II, nurses’ recorded interactions (n=40) with standardized cases were analyzed by two trained raters using the new tool. Data Analysis: Content validity was calculated using the interrater agreement and content validity index. Interrater reliability was established by analyzing the nurses’ verbal responses in each of the categories of decision support skill. Findings and Implications: This new tool can be used to train nurses less experienced in telephone mediated decision support and improve these skills in nurses who already provide cancer care over the telephone, in turn supporting patients to engage in self-care while at home.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:25Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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