Attitudinal Differences Among Women With and Without a Family History of Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165321
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attitudinal Differences Among Women With and Without a Family History of Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Boehmke, M.; Dickerson, S.
Author Details:
M. Boehmke, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA; S. Dickerson
Abstract:
As women are diagnosed with breast cancer, oncology nurses need to be aware of the intense emotions experienced particularly in those women with no family history of breast cancer. Serious attention needs to be given to history taking as it clearly affects the woman’s approach to the diagnosis and resulting treatment. Assessing distress in women with breast cancer, nurse’s need to be aware that a woman’s view/perception of breast cancer affects their experiences and response to symptoms encountered. Purpose: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to investigate the attitudes and lived-experience among women recently diagnosed with breast cancer with and without a family history. Variables/Concepts Studied: (1.) What are the common attitudes/experiences of women diagnosed with breast cancer who have relatives with breast cancer? (2.) Are these attitudes/experiences different from those with no family history of breast cancer? Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Hermeneutic phenomenology was the interpretive approach used. Methods: Purposive sampling of 20 women, newly diagnosed with breast cancer, were recruited from a breast center in Buffalo, New York. Hermeneutic phenomenology, that emphasizes the lived-experience holistically, guided interviews of women who were asked to tell their story about their breast cancer diagnosis. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed. Data Analysis: Data analysis consisted of thematic analysis of the narratives and review with a nurse experienced in this research method. Findings and Implications: Three themes emerged: (1.) Women with a family history of breast cancer had a more optimistic/hopeful view of the diagnosis of breast cancer, focusing on survivorship; (2.) Women with a family history of breast cancer approached the diagnosis with a “when, not if” manner; (3.) Women with no family history were shocked by the diagnosis and experienced a precipitous change in life from health to illness overnight. Implications: Women newly diagnosed with breast cancer who had a family history dealt better with the diagnosis and viewed it as a short-term problem in their life. Relatives had survived and they felt they would do likewise. Women with no family history were unsuspecting and had a difficult life transition that affected not only the symptom experience but their quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Western New York Susan G. Komen Foundation.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttitudinal Differences Among Women With and Without a Family History of Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoehmke, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDickerson, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Boehmke, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA; S. Dickersonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165321-
dc.description.abstractAs women are diagnosed with breast cancer, oncology nurses need to be aware of the intense emotions experienced particularly in those women with no family history of breast cancer. Serious attention needs to be given to history taking as it clearly affects the woman’s approach to the diagnosis and resulting treatment. Assessing distress in women with breast cancer, nurse’s need to be aware that a woman’s view/perception of breast cancer affects their experiences and response to symptoms encountered. Purpose: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to investigate the attitudes and lived-experience among women recently diagnosed with breast cancer with and without a family history. Variables/Concepts Studied: (1.) What are the common attitudes/experiences of women diagnosed with breast cancer who have relatives with breast cancer? (2.) Are these attitudes/experiences different from those with no family history of breast cancer? Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Hermeneutic phenomenology was the interpretive approach used. Methods: Purposive sampling of 20 women, newly diagnosed with breast cancer, were recruited from a breast center in Buffalo, New York. Hermeneutic phenomenology, that emphasizes the lived-experience holistically, guided interviews of women who were asked to tell their story about their breast cancer diagnosis. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed. Data Analysis: Data analysis consisted of thematic analysis of the narratives and review with a nurse experienced in this research method. Findings and Implications: Three themes emerged: (1.) Women with a family history of breast cancer had a more optimistic/hopeful view of the diagnosis of breast cancer, focusing on survivorship; (2.) Women with a family history of breast cancer approached the diagnosis with a “when, not if” manner; (3.) Women with no family history were shocked by the diagnosis and experienced a precipitous change in life from health to illness overnight. Implications: Women newly diagnosed with breast cancer who had a family history dealt better with the diagnosis and viewed it as a short-term problem in their life. Relatives had survived and they felt they would do likewise. Women with no family history were unsuspecting and had a difficult life transition that affected not only the symptom experience but their quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:26Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Western New York Susan G. Komen Foundation.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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