2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165322
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Brief Sleep Intervention for Family Caregivers
Author(s):
Carter, P.
Author Details:
P. Carter, The University of Texas- Austin, SON, Austin, Texas, USA
Abstract:
Behavioral sleep interventions are effective in reducing insomnia, however, traditional delivery methods are not as effective for caregivers. This research presents a brief behavioral sleep intervention for use with caregivers of persons with cancer. Purpose: Family caregivers of persons with cancer report having severe insomnia as a result of caregiving. Insomnia has been linked to negative emotional and physiologic outcomes. Caregivers wish to continue to provide care; however in the face of chronic insomnia they may have that option taken from them. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: This study uses the stress and coping framework of Lazarus and Folkman (1984).This framework provides information about how the stress laden process of caregiving influences caregiver physiologic and emotional responses to providing care to a loved one with cancer. Methods: Experimental repeated measures design was used. Recruitment occurred at outpatient oncology centers. Data was collected and the intervention administered in caregivers’ homes. Inclusion criteria were: > 20 years of age, co-residing with a cancer patient, fluent in English, and freely consenting. Exclusion criteria were previous diagnosis of sleep and/or psychological disorders. Following consent, caregivers were randomized to attention control and intervention groups. Sleep (PSQI & Actigraph), depression (CESD), and quality of life (CGQOL-C) measures were taken at weeks 1, 3 and 5 with follow-up measures at 2, 3, and 4 months. Twenty of the targeted 66 caregivers have completed the study. The Caregiver Sleep Intervention is a 5-week behavioral sleep intervention using Sleep hygiene, Sleep Restriction, Relaxation techniques, and goal attainment scaling. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics were conducted for all variables. T-tests were conducted to explore differences between groups on variables of interest. Effect sizes were calculated. Findings and Implications: Intervention caregivers’ sleep quality and quality of life scores improved significantly more than did attention-control caregivers’. Depression scores improved for both groups; however no significant difference was noted between groups. Intervention effect sizes (d) for sleep quality, quality of life and depression ranged from 0.8-0.9.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Brief Sleep Intervention for Family Caregiversen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarter, P.en_US
dc.author.detailsP. Carter, The University of Texas- Austin, SON, Austin, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165322-
dc.description.abstractBehavioral sleep interventions are effective in reducing insomnia, however, traditional delivery methods are not as effective for caregivers. This research presents a brief behavioral sleep intervention for use with caregivers of persons with cancer. Purpose: Family caregivers of persons with cancer report having severe insomnia as a result of caregiving. Insomnia has been linked to negative emotional and physiologic outcomes. Caregivers wish to continue to provide care; however in the face of chronic insomnia they may have that option taken from them. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: This study uses the stress and coping framework of Lazarus and Folkman (1984).This framework provides information about how the stress laden process of caregiving influences caregiver physiologic and emotional responses to providing care to a loved one with cancer. Methods: Experimental repeated measures design was used. Recruitment occurred at outpatient oncology centers. Data was collected and the intervention administered in caregivers’ homes. Inclusion criteria were: > 20 years of age, co-residing with a cancer patient, fluent in English, and freely consenting. Exclusion criteria were previous diagnosis of sleep and/or psychological disorders. Following consent, caregivers were randomized to attention control and intervention groups. Sleep (PSQI & Actigraph), depression (CESD), and quality of life (CGQOL-C) measures were taken at weeks 1, 3 and 5 with follow-up measures at 2, 3, and 4 months. Twenty of the targeted 66 caregivers have completed the study. The Caregiver Sleep Intervention is a 5-week behavioral sleep intervention using Sleep hygiene, Sleep Restriction, Relaxation techniques, and goal attainment scaling. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics were conducted for all variables. T-tests were conducted to explore differences between groups on variables of interest. Effect sizes were calculated. Findings and Implications: Intervention caregivers’ sleep quality and quality of life scores improved significantly more than did attention-control caregivers’. Depression scores improved for both groups; however no significant difference was noted between groups. Intervention effect sizes (d) for sleep quality, quality of life and depression ranged from 0.8-0.9.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:27Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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