2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165323
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Experience of Breast Cancer Survivors
Author(s):
Cartwright, F.
Author Details:
F. Cartwright, Valley Hospital, Paramus, New Jersey, USA
Abstract:
There is a growing number of breast cancer survivors (stage 0-IV) who are on observation, or a form of ongoing therapy (FOT) in recovery. Oncology nurses need to gain an understanding of these survivors symptom experience to plan education and supportive interventions. Purpose: Symptom experience related to stage of disease (SOD) and FOT is an important concern and is lacking in the literature. This study explored the symptom experience of women with breast cancer in recovery and its relationship to SOD and FOT. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Applying Lazarus & Folkman (1984) and Lazarus (1993) framework to breast cancer survivors in recovery, stress appraisal will influence perception of the symptom, the evaluation of the meaning of the symptom and the degree of distress that the woman experiences related to SOD and FOT. Methods: Using a descriptive, correlational design, data was collected from 131 women with breast cancer (Stage 0-IV) in the recovery phase of breast cancer. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire, the Breast Cancer Treatment Response Inventory (BCTRI), (Hoskins, 1990), a check-off for 23 symptoms, which are then rated on a scale of 0 – 3 for both severity of symptoms (SOS) and amount of distress experienced (ADE). SOD and FOT were recorded on the BCTRI. Data analysis: Means, standard deviation, ranges and skewness for variables were calculated. First ten NOS reported were: Difficulty sleeping (58%), sweats (57%), fatigue (55%), emotional upset (52%), shoulder/arm discomfort (44%), vaginal dryness (44%), sexual problems (34%), difficulty concentrating (31%), pain (31%), numbness/tingling (28%). Pearson correlation coefficient indicated ADE is statistically significant to NOS (r = .883, p = .000) and to SOS (r =.954, p = .000). Two-way ANOVAs for NOS, SOS, and ADE revealed significant main effects (p < .005) for SOD and FOT, indicating that each influences NOS, SOS, and ADE. Findings and Implications: The oncology nurse plays a pivotal role in assessing women in recovery who often need ongoing comprehensive information and support. The physical, psychological, and emotional symptom experience of breast cancer survivors do result in ongoing challenges. The findings of this study can be used to identify strategies that are conducive to problem-focused or emotion focused coping (Lazarus, 1993), or a combination of both.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Experience of Breast Cancer Survivorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCartwright, F.en_US
dc.author.detailsF. Cartwright, Valley Hospital, Paramus, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165323-
dc.description.abstractThere is a growing number of breast cancer survivors (stage 0-IV) who are on observation, or a form of ongoing therapy (FOT) in recovery. Oncology nurses need to gain an understanding of these survivors symptom experience to plan education and supportive interventions. Purpose: Symptom experience related to stage of disease (SOD) and FOT is an important concern and is lacking in the literature. This study explored the symptom experience of women with breast cancer in recovery and its relationship to SOD and FOT. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Applying Lazarus &amp; Folkman (1984) and Lazarus (1993) framework to breast cancer survivors in recovery, stress appraisal will influence perception of the symptom, the evaluation of the meaning of the symptom and the degree of distress that the woman experiences related to SOD and FOT. Methods: Using a descriptive, correlational design, data was collected from 131 women with breast cancer (Stage 0-IV) in the recovery phase of breast cancer. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire, the Breast Cancer Treatment Response Inventory (BCTRI), (Hoskins, 1990), a check-off for 23 symptoms, which are then rated on a scale of 0 &ndash; 3 for both severity of symptoms (SOS) and amount of distress experienced (ADE). SOD and FOT were recorded on the BCTRI. Data analysis: Means, standard deviation, ranges and skewness for variables were calculated. First ten NOS reported were: Difficulty sleeping (58%), sweats (57%), fatigue (55%), emotional upset (52%), shoulder/arm discomfort (44%), vaginal dryness (44%), sexual problems (34%), difficulty concentrating (31%), pain (31%), numbness/tingling (28%). Pearson correlation coefficient indicated ADE is statistically significant to NOS (r = .883, p = .000) and to SOS (r =.954, p = .000). Two-way ANOVAs for NOS, SOS, and ADE revealed significant main effects (p &lt; .005) for SOD and FOT, indicating that each influences NOS, SOS, and ADE. Findings and Implications: The oncology nurse plays a pivotal role in assessing women in recovery who often need ongoing comprehensive information and support. The physical, psychological, and emotional symptom experience of breast cancer survivors do result in ongoing challenges. The findings of this study can be used to identify strategies that are conducive to problem-focused or emotion focused coping (Lazarus, 1993), or a combination of both.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:28Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.