2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165324
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment of Oncology Nurses Through the Internet
Author(s):
Chee, W.; Im, E.O.
Author Details:
W. Chee, The University of TX - San Antonio, Dept of Mechanical Engineering & Biomechanics, San Antonio, Texas, USA; E. O. Im
Abstract:
Much of the information regarding the usage of computer and Internet technologies in research is still anecdotal, and little research has been conducted related to nurses’ or patients’ use of computer networks. Therefore, very little is known about the effectiveness of recruitment of oncology nurses for research through the Internet. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to provide future directions for recruitment of oncology nurses for Internet research based on the issues raised in an Internet survey study on cancer pain management. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: A feminist approach guided the analysis process. Methods: Throughout the research process, the research staff recorded issues as they arose and wrote memos regarding the recruitment issues and possible reasons for the issues. Weekly group discussions were conducted, and written records of these discussions were kept. Data Analysis: The written memos and records were reviewed and analyzed using the content analysis suggested by Weber. The unit of analysis was individual words, and the memos and written records were analyzed using line-by-line coding. Then, the codes were categorized according to the contents, and idea categories were developed from the categorization process. Findings and Implications: The idea categories included "a low response rate," "flexibility required," "mutual trust," "a selected group of oncology nurses," and "changing Internet dynamics." The response rate of oncology nurses was about 3%. Among a total of 257 nursing professional organizations, only 6 actually announced the study. Because of the low response rate, flexibility in the recruitment strategies was essential in the recruitment process. Mutual trust was one of the difficult aspects of the recruitment because Internet interactions are based on non face-to-face interactions. Most of the participants were highly educated oncology nurses with a master degree in a high administrative position. Online populations in these days tended to chat in chat rooms rather than posting messages through message boards. With the increasing number of spam mails, people tended not to open emails sent by a stranger. For future Internet research, we suggest: (a) recruitment through multiple Internet and real settings, (b) the usage of various strategies, (c) quota sampling method, and (d) creative motivation strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment of Oncology Nurses Through the Interneten_GB
dc.contributor.authorChee, W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorIm, E.O.en_US
dc.author.detailsW. Chee, The University of TX - San Antonio, Dept of Mechanical Engineering & Biomechanics, San Antonio, Texas, USA; E. O. Imen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165324-
dc.description.abstractMuch of the information regarding the usage of computer and Internet technologies in research is still anecdotal, and little research has been conducted related to nurses’ or patients’ use of computer networks. Therefore, very little is known about the effectiveness of recruitment of oncology nurses for research through the Internet. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to provide future directions for recruitment of oncology nurses for Internet research based on the issues raised in an Internet survey study on cancer pain management. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: A feminist approach guided the analysis process. Methods: Throughout the research process, the research staff recorded issues as they arose and wrote memos regarding the recruitment issues and possible reasons for the issues. Weekly group discussions were conducted, and written records of these discussions were kept. Data Analysis: The written memos and records were reviewed and analyzed using the content analysis suggested by Weber. The unit of analysis was individual words, and the memos and written records were analyzed using line-by-line coding. Then, the codes were categorized according to the contents, and idea categories were developed from the categorization process. Findings and Implications: The idea categories included "a low response rate," "flexibility required," "mutual trust," "a selected group of oncology nurses," and "changing Internet dynamics." The response rate of oncology nurses was about 3%. Among a total of 257 nursing professional organizations, only 6 actually announced the study. Because of the low response rate, flexibility in the recruitment strategies was essential in the recruitment process. Mutual trust was one of the difficult aspects of the recruitment because Internet interactions are based on non face-to-face interactions. Most of the participants were highly educated oncology nurses with a master degree in a high administrative position. Online populations in these days tended to chat in chat rooms rather than posting messages through message boards. With the increasing number of spam mails, people tended not to open emails sent by a stranger. For future Internet research, we suggest: (a) recruitment through multiple Internet and real settings, (b) the usage of various strategies, (c) quota sampling method, and (d) creative motivation strategies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:29Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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