2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165326
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Risk Factor Screening Tool for Lung Cancer (RFST-LC) Revised: Pilot Data
Author(s):
Chernecky, C.
Author Details:
C. Chernecky, Medical College of Georgia, USA
Abstract:
Lung cancer is a leading cause of death. There is no self-administered screening tool to assist practitioners in diagnosing lung cancer at earlier stages for at risk populations in neglected and rural areas. Purpose: Bringing people to the healthcare system earlier can enhance earlier diagnosis. The revised RFST-LC was developed for general practice settings to alert practitioners of patients at risk. The tool is based on an in-depth literature review and prospective research. Items in the original tool included risk factors of environment, job, genetics, symptoms, medications, comorbidities and biological/diagnostic markers. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Framework is based on self-care in screening of at-risk populations. Theoretical basis includes that earlier assessment leads to earlier diagnosis. Methods: Twenty-five convenient lung cancer patients were prospectively interviewed and chart reviews. Measurement was a checklist format of 26 items. This pilot work resulted in the revised 14-item tool. In the future, the final tool will require a larger sample size, per power analysis, and patients with all types of lung cancer for validity establishment. Data Analysis: Of 26 factors tested, 16 were confirmed positive at a prevalence of > 24 % and considered clinical significant for assessment by healthcare providers. The range of scores for positive items was 5 to 14. Two items were dropped for expense and low prevalence. From this data the revised 14-item tool was developed. Findings and Implications: The top 4 items, above 80%, were cough, SOB, history of tobacco use and second hand smoke. Factors between 45-65% were weight loss, job history, fatigue and current medications. Two new factors were discovered, bronchitis without complete resolve and consistent sputum production increase upon awakening. Of 26 items tested, 16 occurred in > 24 %, 3 occurred in less than 24%, and 7 were ruled out. These results show promise for the continued development of a simple and easy tool to help clinicians begin to identify high-risk patients earlier. This can lead to further assessment and earlier diagnosis, particularly for vulnerable populations and those in healthcare poor environments. The newly revised 14-item RFSC-LC is based on the above pilot work.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRisk Factor Screening Tool for Lung Cancer (RFST-LC) Revised: Pilot Dataen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChernecky, C.en_US
dc.author.detailsC. Chernecky, Medical College of Georgia, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165326-
dc.description.abstractLung cancer is a leading cause of death. There is no self-administered screening tool to assist practitioners in diagnosing lung cancer at earlier stages for at risk populations in neglected and rural areas. Purpose: Bringing people to the healthcare system earlier can enhance earlier diagnosis. The revised RFST-LC was developed for general practice settings to alert practitioners of patients at risk. The tool is based on an in-depth literature review and prospective research. Items in the original tool included risk factors of environment, job, genetics, symptoms, medications, comorbidities and biological/diagnostic markers. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Framework is based on self-care in screening of at-risk populations. Theoretical basis includes that earlier assessment leads to earlier diagnosis. Methods: Twenty-five convenient lung cancer patients were prospectively interviewed and chart reviews. Measurement was a checklist format of 26 items. This pilot work resulted in the revised 14-item tool. In the future, the final tool will require a larger sample size, per power analysis, and patients with all types of lung cancer for validity establishment. Data Analysis: Of 26 factors tested, 16 were confirmed positive at a prevalence of > 24 % and considered clinical significant for assessment by healthcare providers. The range of scores for positive items was 5 to 14. Two items were dropped for expense and low prevalence. From this data the revised 14-item tool was developed. Findings and Implications: The top 4 items, above 80%, were cough, SOB, history of tobacco use and second hand smoke. Factors between 45-65% were weight loss, job history, fatigue and current medications. Two new factors were discovered, bronchitis without complete resolve and consistent sputum production increase upon awakening. Of 26 items tested, 16 occurred in > 24 %, 3 occurred in less than 24%, and 7 were ruled out. These results show promise for the continued development of a simple and easy tool to help clinicians begin to identify high-risk patients earlier. This can lead to further assessment and earlier diagnosis, particularly for vulnerable populations and those in healthcare poor environments. The newly revised 14-item RFSC-LC is based on the above pilot work.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:32Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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