2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165329
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Advancing Our Knowledge of Symptom Clusters
Author(s):
Dodd, M.; Cho, M.; Cooper, B.; Miaskowski, C.; Lee, K.; Bank, M. A.
Author Details:
M. Dodd, UCSF, Rm N631, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA; M. Cho; B. Cooper; C. Miaskowski; K. Lee; M. A. Bank
Abstract:
Symptom clusters is an emerging area of study in symptom management and cancer care. Purpose: To explore the underlying dimensions and structure of concurrently-related symptoms and correlation with performance status in women with breast cancer over time. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Symptom Management Model Methods: 80 women with breast cancer, mean age 49 (SD=9.6), completed an established Symptom Severity Checklist (26 items) and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) three times as part of an ongoing randomized clinical trial; T1=baseline after first cycle of chemotherapy, T2=completion of all treatment, and T3=end of study at 4-6 months later. Data Analysis: An exploratory Principal Components Analysis with Varimax rotation and Pearson Correlation Coefficient were used. Findings and Implications: Analysis suggested: T1, four components accounted for 50% of the variance [sensory (6-items), gastrointestinal-related (6-items), cognitive and respiratory (5-items), and pain and fatigue (6-items)]; T2, two components accounted for 54% of the variance [cognitive, pain and fatigue (12-items) and gastrointestinal-related component (9-items)]; and T3, four components accounted for 59% of the variance [cognitive, pain and fatigue (6-items), lower gastrointestinal-related (6-items), upper gastrointestinal-related (5-items), and sensory (6-items)]. Correlations between the mean severity score of several components and KPS were significant, specifically pain and fatigue (T1:r=-0.48, p<0.01); and cognitive, pain, and fatigue (T2:r=-0.55, T3:r=-0.39, p<0.01). This preliminary analysis provided longitudinal examination of concurrently-related symptoms. These findings are innovative in advancing our knowledge of symptom clusters research.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: NIH, NCI CA 83316 and ONS Foundation CLIR/Symptom Cluster Grant
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdvancing Our Knowledge of Symptom Clustersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDodd, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCho, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCooper, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiaskowski, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBank, M. A.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Dodd, UCSF, Rm N631, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA; M. Cho; B. Cooper; C. Miaskowski; K. Lee; M. A. Banken_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165329-
dc.description.abstractSymptom clusters is an emerging area of study in symptom management and cancer care. Purpose: To explore the underlying dimensions and structure of concurrently-related symptoms and correlation with performance status in women with breast cancer over time. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Symptom Management Model Methods: 80 women with breast cancer, mean age 49 (SD=9.6), completed an established Symptom Severity Checklist (26 items) and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) three times as part of an ongoing randomized clinical trial; T1=baseline after first cycle of chemotherapy, T2=completion of all treatment, and T3=end of study at 4-6 months later. Data Analysis: An exploratory Principal Components Analysis with Varimax rotation and Pearson Correlation Coefficient were used. Findings and Implications: Analysis suggested: T1, four components accounted for 50% of the variance [sensory (6-items), gastrointestinal-related (6-items), cognitive and respiratory (5-items), and pain and fatigue (6-items)]; T2, two components accounted for 54% of the variance [cognitive, pain and fatigue (12-items) and gastrointestinal-related component (9-items)]; and T3, four components accounted for 59% of the variance [cognitive, pain and fatigue (6-items), lower gastrointestinal-related (6-items), upper gastrointestinal-related (5-items), and sensory (6-items)]. Correlations between the mean severity score of several components and KPS were significant, specifically pain and fatigue (T1:r=-0.48, p&lt;0.01); and cognitive, pain, and fatigue (T2:r=-0.55, T3:r=-0.39, p&lt;0.01). This preliminary analysis provided longitudinal examination of concurrently-related symptoms. These findings are innovative in advancing our knowledge of symptom clusters research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:35Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: NIH, NCI CA 83316 and ONS Foundation CLIR/Symptom Cluster Grant-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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