Symptoms at End-Of-Life Among Individuals With Cancer Not Designated as Terminal

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165330
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptoms at End-Of-Life Among Individuals With Cancer Not Designated as Terminal
Author(s):
Doorenbos, A.; Given, B.; Given, C.; Virbitsky, N.
Author Details:
A. Doorenbos, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA; B. Given; C. Given; N. Virbitsky
Abstract:
A substantial body of work describes the health status of individuals with advanced cancer and receiving palliative care. Common across these reports are high levels of symptom experience at end-of-life. It is not known if the symptom reports at end-of-life are different in individuals who are not designated as terminal. Purpose: Among individuals who were not designated as terminal at the time of accrual, but who subsequently died, determine if nearness to the date of death and the level of emotional distress at the observations made nearing death affect the number and the hierarchical ordering of 21 common cancer symptoms. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Lazarus and Folkman’s stress and coping theory explains the process of adapting to various stressful events, including impact of psychological distress on the symptom experience of a life-threatening illness such as cancer. Methods: Secondary analysis of individuals with cancer who died (N = 198), obtained from three different longitudinal studies. Individuals were recruited from cancer centers, signed consent forms, and were interviewed over the course of a year. Measures included the Symptom Experience tool, the CESD, and descriptive questions. Death certificates from a statewide registry were obtained to identify the date of death for up to 12 months after completion of the studies. Data Analysis: A three level Hierarchical linear model (HLM) was used for analysis. Level-1 is the hierarchical frequency of 21 symptoms. Level-2 is the equation for the trajectory of each individual representing change over time within person or the repeated measures of symptoms and depression. Level-3 explains that trajectory via person-specific characteristics. Restricted Maximum Likelihood was used as the method of estimation. Findings and Implications: There were changes in symptom number with more patients reporting more symptoms and in the hierarchical ordering of symptom frequency as individuals with cancer approached death. Depression worsened the symptom experience. This secondary analysis describes the changes in the number and hierarchical ordering of symptom frequency during the months prior to death. A key element of this study was that although the patients died, they had not been formally designated as terminal; they had not been referred to hospice, nor had treatment been withdrawn. Thus, this research expands our understanding of the symptom experience at end-of-life for individuals with cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptoms at End-Of-Life Among Individuals With Cancer Not Designated as Terminalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDoorenbos, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGiven, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGiven, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVirbitsky, N.en_US
dc.author.detailsA. Doorenbos, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA; B. Given; C. Given; N. Virbitskyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165330-
dc.description.abstractA substantial body of work describes the health status of individuals with advanced cancer and receiving palliative care. Common across these reports are high levels of symptom experience at end-of-life. It is not known if the symptom reports at end-of-life are different in individuals who are not designated as terminal. Purpose: Among individuals who were not designated as terminal at the time of accrual, but who subsequently died, determine if nearness to the date of death and the level of emotional distress at the observations made nearing death affect the number and the hierarchical ordering of 21 common cancer symptoms. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Lazarus and Folkman’s stress and coping theory explains the process of adapting to various stressful events, including impact of psychological distress on the symptom experience of a life-threatening illness such as cancer. Methods: Secondary analysis of individuals with cancer who died (N = 198), obtained from three different longitudinal studies. Individuals were recruited from cancer centers, signed consent forms, and were interviewed over the course of a year. Measures included the Symptom Experience tool, the CESD, and descriptive questions. Death certificates from a statewide registry were obtained to identify the date of death for up to 12 months after completion of the studies. Data Analysis: A three level Hierarchical linear model (HLM) was used for analysis. Level-1 is the hierarchical frequency of 21 symptoms. Level-2 is the equation for the trajectory of each individual representing change over time within person or the repeated measures of symptoms and depression. Level-3 explains that trajectory via person-specific characteristics. Restricted Maximum Likelihood was used as the method of estimation. Findings and Implications: There were changes in symptom number with more patients reporting more symptoms and in the hierarchical ordering of symptom frequency as individuals with cancer approached death. Depression worsened the symptom experience. This secondary analysis describes the changes in the number and hierarchical ordering of symptom frequency during the months prior to death. A key element of this study was that although the patients died, they had not been formally designated as terminal; they had not been referred to hospice, nor had treatment been withdrawn. Thus, this research expands our understanding of the symptom experience at end-of-life for individuals with cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:36Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.