Developing and Implementing a Psychosocial Care Program in a Community Oncology Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165331
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing and Implementing a Psychosocial Care Program in a Community Oncology Practice
Author(s):
Dudley, G.; Krawchuk, C.; Quargnenti, A.; Crook, B.
Author Details:
G. Dudley, Central GA Hematology Oncology, Macon, Georgia, USA; C. Krawchuk; A. Quargnenti; B. Crook
Abstract:
It is estimated that 25-40% of patients with cancer are significantly distressed, and only 10% of these patients are properly referred for psychosocial care. Untreated, distress can affect patients’ quality of life and ability to adhere to their treatment schedule, possibly affecting survival as well. In addition, patient education may take place in a busy treatment room – where the proximity of other patients, noise level, and nursing tasks may interfere with adequate patient and family teaching. Purpose: To develop a program for promoting psychological and social well-being and providing individualized chemotherapy education for patients with cancer and their families. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Team members at two community oncology practices participating in AIM Higher, a quality improvement program, identified the need for improvement in meeting psychosocial and educational needs of cancer patients. Methods: A 30-minute wellness evaluation by a clinical health psychologist consists of an evaluation of patient’s coping skills, assessment of available social support, and introduction of stress management techniques. Immediately following this session, an individualized chemotherapy education session by a nurse educator begins the learning process and covers the treatment plan, expected side effects, and strategies to prevent or minimize side effects. A plan for reimbursement and coding is developed. Data Analysis: To date over 300 patients have been evaluated by this process and expressed satisfaction with this program. Evaluation will continue throughout the patient’s course of care. Patients will be redirected to psychologists as their routine psychological assessment indicates worsening of anxiety and depression. This model allows patients to feel safe in discussing psychosocial concerns that may otherwise go unaddressed in a busy practice setting. Recognizing the need for treatment of the whole person has improved communication between the patient and medical staff. Findings and Implications: In this era of managed care, certain aspects of patient care are often neglected. Addressing emotional and physical needs is essential for improving the care we provide and enhancing quality of life for cancer patients. An integrated approach using the physician, psychologist and nurse educator for assessment and management of psychosocial distress is the most efficient way to accomplish these goals.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping and Implementing a Psychosocial Care Program in a Community Oncology Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDudley, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKrawchuk, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorQuargnenti, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCrook, B.en_US
dc.author.detailsG. Dudley, Central GA Hematology Oncology, Macon, Georgia, USA; C. Krawchuk; A. Quargnenti; B. Crooken_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165331-
dc.description.abstractIt is estimated that 25-40% of patients with cancer are significantly distressed, and only 10% of these patients are properly referred for psychosocial care. Untreated, distress can affect patients’ quality of life and ability to adhere to their treatment schedule, possibly affecting survival as well. In addition, patient education may take place in a busy treatment room – where the proximity of other patients, noise level, and nursing tasks may interfere with adequate patient and family teaching. Purpose: To develop a program for promoting psychological and social well-being and providing individualized chemotherapy education for patients with cancer and their families. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Team members at two community oncology practices participating in AIM Higher, a quality improvement program, identified the need for improvement in meeting psychosocial and educational needs of cancer patients. Methods: A 30-minute wellness evaluation by a clinical health psychologist consists of an evaluation of patient’s coping skills, assessment of available social support, and introduction of stress management techniques. Immediately following this session, an individualized chemotherapy education session by a nurse educator begins the learning process and covers the treatment plan, expected side effects, and strategies to prevent or minimize side effects. A plan for reimbursement and coding is developed. Data Analysis: To date over 300 patients have been evaluated by this process and expressed satisfaction with this program. Evaluation will continue throughout the patient’s course of care. Patients will be redirected to psychologists as their routine psychological assessment indicates worsening of anxiety and depression. This model allows patients to feel safe in discussing psychosocial concerns that may otherwise go unaddressed in a busy practice setting. Recognizing the need for treatment of the whole person has improved communication between the patient and medical staff. Findings and Implications: In this era of managed care, certain aspects of patient care are often neglected. Addressing emotional and physical needs is essential for improving the care we provide and enhancing quality of life for cancer patients. An integrated approach using the physician, psychologist and nurse educator for assessment and management of psychosocial distress is the most efficient way to accomplish these goals.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:37Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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