2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165332
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Complementary and Alternative Therapy Use By Cancer Patients
Author(s):
Fouladbakhsh, J.; Stommel, M.; Given, B.; Given, C.
Author Details:
L. Fouladbakhsh, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA; M. Stommel; B. Given; C. Given
Abstract:
Complementary and alternative therapies (CAT) are used by cancer patients along with 'mainstream' medical treatments. Estimates of CAT use by cancer patients range from 7-64%. It is important for oncology nurses to understand factors that lead to use of CAT because of implications for nursing care. Purpose: This study sought to determine predictors of use of CAT by cancer patients. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Andersen’s Behavioral Model of Health Services Use was employed. The study focused on three key aspects of the model: predisposing, enabling and need-for-care factors, which are relevant to the prediction of CAT use. Methods: A secondary analysis of two NIH federally funded panel studies was conducted. The sample included lung, breast, colon and prostate cancer patients (N=968), interviewed in two panel waves (three months apart). Study participants were asked if they used any of the following complementary/alternative therapies: herbs/supplements, spiritual healing, relaxation, massage, acupuncture, energy healing, hypnosis, therapeutic spas, alternative diets, audio/videotapes, osteopathic, homeopathic or chiropractic treatment. Most of the sample (97%)received ‘mainstream’ medical treatment: surgery (65%), chemotherapy (38.5%) radiation therapy (54%). The dependent, dichotomous variable for this analysis was: use or no-use of any of the identified complementary/alternative therapies at time of interviews. Independent variables analyzed in the model included: Predisposing: gender, age, race, education, marital status; Enabling: income, health insurance status, caregiver presence, geographic location; Need-for-care: cancer stage, site, symptoms, treatment, perceived health need. Data Analysis: Binary Logistic Regression was the primary statistical model employed in the analysis, which focused on the between-subject differences in CAT use (disregarding changes in use over time). A stepwise procedure was followed in which potential predictor variables were excluded from the model if their p-value exceeded 0.10. Findings and Implications: Statistically significant predictors of at least one-time CAT use were: gender (women's odds of CAT use is 2.5 times larger than men's), marital status (single and divorced persons are more likely to use CAT), income (the higher the income, the more likely to use CAT), and cancer treatment (patients who underwent surgery were more likely to use CAT). Implications for nursing practice will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Complementary and Alternative Therapy Use By Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFouladbakhsh, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStommel, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGiven, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGiven, C.en_US
dc.author.detailsL. Fouladbakhsh, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA; M. Stommel; B. Given; C. Givenen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165332-
dc.description.abstractComplementary and alternative therapies (CAT) are used by cancer patients along with 'mainstream' medical treatments. Estimates of CAT use by cancer patients range from 7-64%. It is important for oncology nurses to understand factors that lead to use of CAT because of implications for nursing care. Purpose: This study sought to determine predictors of use of CAT by cancer patients. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Andersen’s Behavioral Model of Health Services Use was employed. The study focused on three key aspects of the model: predisposing, enabling and need-for-care factors, which are relevant to the prediction of CAT use. Methods: A secondary analysis of two NIH federally funded panel studies was conducted. The sample included lung, breast, colon and prostate cancer patients (N=968), interviewed in two panel waves (three months apart). Study participants were asked if they used any of the following complementary/alternative therapies: herbs/supplements, spiritual healing, relaxation, massage, acupuncture, energy healing, hypnosis, therapeutic spas, alternative diets, audio/videotapes, osteopathic, homeopathic or chiropractic treatment. Most of the sample (97%)received ‘mainstream’ medical treatment: surgery (65%), chemotherapy (38.5%) radiation therapy (54%). The dependent, dichotomous variable for this analysis was: use or no-use of any of the identified complementary/alternative therapies at time of interviews. Independent variables analyzed in the model included: Predisposing: gender, age, race, education, marital status; Enabling: income, health insurance status, caregiver presence, geographic location; Need-for-care: cancer stage, site, symptoms, treatment, perceived health need. Data Analysis: Binary Logistic Regression was the primary statistical model employed in the analysis, which focused on the between-subject differences in CAT use (disregarding changes in use over time). A stepwise procedure was followed in which potential predictor variables were excluded from the model if their p-value exceeded 0.10. Findings and Implications: Statistically significant predictors of at least one-time CAT use were: gender (women's odds of CAT use is 2.5 times larger than men's), marital status (single and divorced persons are more likely to use CAT), income (the higher the income, the more likely to use CAT), and cancer treatment (patients who underwent surgery were more likely to use CAT). Implications for nursing practice will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:38Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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