2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165333
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Internet Communities/Groups for Ethnic Minorities
Author(s):
Guevara, E.; Tsai, H. M.; Bender, M.; Page, R.; Cheng, C. Y.; Kang, N. M.; Jenkins, S.; Chee, W.; Im, E. O.
Author Details:
E. Guevara, Applied Materials, Austin, Texas, USA; H. M. Tsai; M. Bender; R. Page; C. Y. Cheng; N. M. Kang; S. Jenkins; W. Chee; E. O. Im
Abstract:
Internet Communities (ICs) have been used as research settings for data collection. Recent studies have indicated that ICs tend to serve highly educated, high-income White males who have easy access to computers. However, those who are not part of this dominant group (e.g., ethnic minorities, women) are marginalized, and their issues are either not considered relevant for study or not reflected accurately in research and health care practice. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to analyze ICEMs (Internet Communities Ethnic Minorities) searched through Google.com, Yahoo.com, MSN.com., and AOL.com and provide directions for future oncology nursing research. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: A feminist perspective was used to analyze ICEMs. Methods: Using the Internet search engines, the websites of 1,588 ICEMs (632 for African Americans, 222 for Asians, and 734 for Hispanics) were searched. During the analysis process, research staff wrote memos regarding the issues related to ICEMs, and conducted email group discussions. Data Analysis: Written memos and email discussion messages were analyzed using the content analysis by Weber. Findings and Implications: First, authenticity issues were found. 80% of ICEMs were not for ethnic minorities although they claimed they were. About 10% of the websites no longer existed. Information provided on some websites was not accurate and current (20 %). Second, intersubjectivity issues were raised. 10-15% of ICEMs were focusing on match-making (e.g., males seeking females). Webmasters of ICEMs rarely responded to the research staff (5% response rate). Third, gender-related issues were found. Some of the ethnic minority sites had sexual content ranging from 10 to 20%, depending on the ethnic group. The female prevalent ICEMs tended to focus on getting emotional and informational support. Finally, ICEMs tended to aim at selected target groups, depending on the ethnic group. For example, about 60% of African American groups aimed at only African American women (e.g., African American Moms, Sisters, etc). The eligibility of the group members was monitored by the moderators in 50% percent of the ICEMs. The analysis suggests the need for development of ethnic-specific support groups for ethnic minorities, standards and policies regulating contents and contact information of ICEMs, quota sampling in Internet recruitment, and education programs for moderators and facilitators.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInternet Communities/Groups for Ethnic Minoritiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGuevara, E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTsai, H. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBender, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPage, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, C. Y.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKang, N. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChee, W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorIm, E. O.en_US
dc.author.detailsE. Guevara, Applied Materials, Austin, Texas, USA; H. M. Tsai; M. Bender; R. Page; C. Y. Cheng; N. M. Kang; S. Jenkins; W. Chee; E. O. Imen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165333-
dc.description.abstractInternet Communities (ICs) have been used as research settings for data collection. Recent studies have indicated that ICs tend to serve highly educated, high-income White males who have easy access to computers. However, those who are not part of this dominant group (e.g., ethnic minorities, women) are marginalized, and their issues are either not considered relevant for study or not reflected accurately in research and health care practice. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to analyze ICEMs (Internet Communities Ethnic Minorities) searched through Google.com, Yahoo.com, MSN.com., and AOL.com and provide directions for future oncology nursing research. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: A feminist perspective was used to analyze ICEMs. Methods: Using the Internet search engines, the websites of 1,588 ICEMs (632 for African Americans, 222 for Asians, and 734 for Hispanics) were searched. During the analysis process, research staff wrote memos regarding the issues related to ICEMs, and conducted email group discussions. Data Analysis: Written memos and email discussion messages were analyzed using the content analysis by Weber. Findings and Implications: First, authenticity issues were found. 80% of ICEMs were not for ethnic minorities although they claimed they were. About 10% of the websites no longer existed. Information provided on some websites was not accurate and current (20 %). Second, intersubjectivity issues were raised. 10-15% of ICEMs were focusing on match-making (e.g., males seeking females). Webmasters of ICEMs rarely responded to the research staff (5% response rate). Third, gender-related issues were found. Some of the ethnic minority sites had sexual content ranging from 10 to 20%, depending on the ethnic group. The female prevalent ICEMs tended to focus on getting emotional and informational support. Finally, ICEMs tended to aim at selected target groups, depending on the ethnic group. For example, about 60% of African American groups aimed at only African American women (e.g., African American Moms, Sisters, etc). The eligibility of the group members was monitored by the moderators in 50% percent of the ICEMs. The analysis suggests the need for development of ethnic-specific support groups for ethnic minorities, standards and policies regulating contents and contact information of ICEMs, quota sampling in Internet recruitment, and education programs for moderators and facilitators.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:39Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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