2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165336
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determinants of Self-Efficacy in Exercise Among Breast Cancer Survivors
Author(s):
Hsu, H. T.; Huang, C. S.; Padilla, G.; Dodd, M.; Lee, K.; Hwant, S. L.; Facione, N.
Author Details:
H. T. Hsu, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; C. S. Huang; G. Padilla; M. Dodd; K. Lee; S. L. Hwant; N. Facione
Abstract:
Determinants of Self-Efficacy in Exercise among Breast Cancer Survivors Purpose: Determinants of Self-Efficacy in Exercise among Breast Cancer Survivors Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer in Taiwanese women. Exercise has been empirically demonstrated to improve overall quality of life in cancer patients. Exercise self-efficacy has been the strongest and most consistent predictor of exercise behavior. However, its predictive value is seldom examined with respect to which factors influence self-efficacy and how self-efficacy changes over time. The purpose of the study is to examine the relationships among exercise self-efficacy at Time 1(after treatment completion-baseline), selected demographic, medical, psychosocial factors at Time 2 (three month follow-up) and exercise self-efficacy at Time 2 among breast cancer survivors in Taiwan. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Self-Efficacy Theory. Methods: The data presented here is from a prospective, longitudinal, repeated measures study in progress. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, multiple regression analysis. Findings and Implications: A total of 139 women with breast cancer responded to questionnaires. On average, subjects were 48.12 ? 9.78 years of age, 73.4% were married, 41.0% were homemakers, 41.7% were Buddhist, and 38.9% were college educated. The majority of the women were diagnosed as having stage I (26.5%) or stage II (52.9 %) breast cancer. All subjects had surgery and received chemotherapy (46.8 %), radiotherapy (12.8 %), or both (40.4 %). Results indicated that Time 1 exercise self-efficacy, exercise barriers, social support, metal health, and exercise outcome expectancy were significant predictors of Time 2 exercise self-efficacy, accounting for 47.7% of the total variance. Time 1 exercise self-efficacy explained 26.8%, exercise barriers 13% and social support for exercise 4% of the variance in Time 2 exercise self-efficacy. Beta weights show higher levels of Time 1 exercise self-efficacy, lower levels of exercise barriers and greater social support related to higher levels of Time 2 exercise self-efficacy. Demographic and medical factors did not contribute significantly to the variance in Time 2 exercise self-efficacy. The longitudinal data indicates that promoting higher exercise self-efficacy during the initial stages of rehabilitation is an effective strategy for increasing exercise self-efficacy three month later. Findings from this study will contribute significantly to the literature on psychosocial and exercise aspects of breast cancer survivors in Taiwan.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Department of Defense of US Army, DAMD17-03-1-0521
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeterminants of Self-Efficacy in Exercise Among Breast Cancer Survivorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHsu, H. T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, C. S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPadilla, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDodd, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHwant, S. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFacione, N.en_US
dc.author.detailsH. T. Hsu, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; C. S. Huang; G. Padilla; M. Dodd; K. Lee; S. L. Hwant; N. Facioneen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165336-
dc.description.abstractDeterminants of Self-Efficacy in Exercise among Breast Cancer Survivors Purpose: Determinants of Self-Efficacy in Exercise among Breast Cancer Survivors Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer in Taiwanese women. Exercise has been empirically demonstrated to improve overall quality of life in cancer patients. Exercise self-efficacy has been the strongest and most consistent predictor of exercise behavior. However, its predictive value is seldom examined with respect to which factors influence self-efficacy and how self-efficacy changes over time. The purpose of the study is to examine the relationships among exercise self-efficacy at Time 1(after treatment completion-baseline), selected demographic, medical, psychosocial factors at Time 2 (three month follow-up) and exercise self-efficacy at Time 2 among breast cancer survivors in Taiwan. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Self-Efficacy Theory. Methods: The data presented here is from a prospective, longitudinal, repeated measures study in progress. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, multiple regression analysis. Findings and Implications: A total of 139 women with breast cancer responded to questionnaires. On average, subjects were 48.12 ? 9.78 years of age, 73.4% were married, 41.0% were homemakers, 41.7% were Buddhist, and 38.9% were college educated. The majority of the women were diagnosed as having stage I (26.5%) or stage II (52.9 %) breast cancer. All subjects had surgery and received chemotherapy (46.8 %), radiotherapy (12.8 %), or both (40.4 %). Results indicated that Time 1 exercise self-efficacy, exercise barriers, social support, metal health, and exercise outcome expectancy were significant predictors of Time 2 exercise self-efficacy, accounting for 47.7% of the total variance. Time 1 exercise self-efficacy explained 26.8%, exercise barriers 13% and social support for exercise 4% of the variance in Time 2 exercise self-efficacy. Beta weights show higher levels of Time 1 exercise self-efficacy, lower levels of exercise barriers and greater social support related to higher levels of Time 2 exercise self-efficacy. Demographic and medical factors did not contribute significantly to the variance in Time 2 exercise self-efficacy. The longitudinal data indicates that promoting higher exercise self-efficacy during the initial stages of rehabilitation is an effective strategy for increasing exercise self-efficacy three month later. Findings from this study will contribute significantly to the literature on psychosocial and exercise aspects of breast cancer survivors in Taiwan.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:43Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Department of Defense of US Army, DAMD17-03-1-0521-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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