2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165337
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Systematic Review of the Effects of Massage on Cancer Pain in Adults
Author(s):
Jane, S. W.; Wilkie, D.; Beaton, R.; Chen, J. I.
Author Details:
S. W. Jane, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Kwe-Shan , Tao-Yuan County, Taiwan; D. Wilkie; R. Beaton; J. I. Chen
Abstract:
Despite the scientific understanding of pain, 51-77% of patients with cancer experience moderate to severe intense pain at some time in their illness trajectory. Theoretically, 90% of cancer pain can be adequately relieved with medical interventions; however, in practice, less than 50% of cancer patients actually achieve effective pain relief. Massage has been used as a means of promoting relaxation responses to reduce pain. Within scientific realms, it is crucial to validate the efficacy of massage with rigorous evaluation processes aimed at implementing this intervention concurrently with pharmacological treatment. Purpose: To date, the results of massage yield inconsistent, partially due to methodological flaws. More importantly, none of the existing published meta-analyses specifically examining massage effects on cancer pain from a methodological perspective. The purpose of this study is to systematically review the effects of massage in managing adult cancer pain. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Nursing is a practice profession, thus, it is obligated for clinicians and researchers to generate a knowledge base for its practice derived from rigorous research. Methods: The systematic review was used to summarize and analyze studies on massage effects resulting in a total of six studies with full text from 1985 to 2004 in English were identified upon the inclusion criteria. A designed tool containing 21 items was employed to systematically evaluate studies. Data Analysis: The frequency distribution of the characteristics of study was used and effect size of pain variable and retrospective power analysis were further calculated. Findings and Implications: Evidence from this review indicates that massage consistently demonstrates an immediate or short-term effect on decreasing pain and anxiety and improving physiologic relaxation. Whereas the longer-term effect on pain, anxiety, quality of life, and activity level yielded inconsistent results. These discrepancies may be related to the lack of a consistent theoretical framework, rigorous inclusion criteria, and a standardized intervention protocol, sensitivity of selected measures, adequate statistical power, consistent effect sizes, and consideration of potential confounding variables and placebo effects. Additionally, future research efforts should focus on examining the underlying mechanisms of massage from the psycho-neuro-immunological perspectives, optimum strength of massage, the length of massage effects, effects on muscle relaxation and sleep, and cost-effectiveness studies. In practice, these findings will provide clinicians with appropriately implement this intervention, thereby enhancing pain management.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSystematic Review of the Effects of Massage on Cancer Pain in Adultsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJane, S. W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilkie, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeaton, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, J. I.en_US
dc.author.detailsS. W. Jane, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Kwe-Shan , Tao-Yuan County, Taiwan; D. Wilkie; R. Beaton; J. I. Chenen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165337-
dc.description.abstractDespite the scientific understanding of pain, 51-77% of patients with cancer experience moderate to severe intense pain at some time in their illness trajectory. Theoretically, 90% of cancer pain can be adequately relieved with medical interventions; however, in practice, less than 50% of cancer patients actually achieve effective pain relief. Massage has been used as a means of promoting relaxation responses to reduce pain. Within scientific realms, it is crucial to validate the efficacy of massage with rigorous evaluation processes aimed at implementing this intervention concurrently with pharmacological treatment. Purpose: To date, the results of massage yield inconsistent, partially due to methodological flaws. More importantly, none of the existing published meta-analyses specifically examining massage effects on cancer pain from a methodological perspective. The purpose of this study is to systematically review the effects of massage in managing adult cancer pain. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Nursing is a practice profession, thus, it is obligated for clinicians and researchers to generate a knowledge base for its practice derived from rigorous research. Methods: The systematic review was used to summarize and analyze studies on massage effects resulting in a total of six studies with full text from 1985 to 2004 in English were identified upon the inclusion criteria. A designed tool containing 21 items was employed to systematically evaluate studies. Data Analysis: The frequency distribution of the characteristics of study was used and effect size of pain variable and retrospective power analysis were further calculated. Findings and Implications: Evidence from this review indicates that massage consistently demonstrates an immediate or short-term effect on decreasing pain and anxiety and improving physiologic relaxation. Whereas the longer-term effect on pain, anxiety, quality of life, and activity level yielded inconsistent results. These discrepancies may be related to the lack of a consistent theoretical framework, rigorous inclusion criteria, and a standardized intervention protocol, sensitivity of selected measures, adequate statistical power, consistent effect sizes, and consideration of potential confounding variables and placebo effects. Additionally, future research efforts should focus on examining the underlying mechanisms of massage from the psycho-neuro-immunological perspectives, optimum strength of massage, the length of massage effects, effects on muscle relaxation and sleep, and cost-effectiveness studies. In practice, these findings will provide clinicians with appropriately implement this intervention, thereby enhancing pain management.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:44Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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