A Meta-Analysis of the Sensitivity of Various Neuropsychological Tests Used to Detect Chemotherapy-Induced Impairments in Cognitive Function

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165338
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Meta-Analysis of the Sensitivity of Various Neuropsychological Tests Used to Detect Chemotherapy-Induced Impairments in Cognitive Function
Author(s):
Jansen, C.; Miaskowski, C.; Dodd, M.; Dowling, G.; Kramer, J.
Author Details:
C. Jansen, Kaiser Permanente, San Francisco, California, USA; C. Miaskowski; M. Dodd; G. Dowling; J. Kramer
Abstract:
Impairment in cognitive function is a newly recognized side effect of chemotherapy (CTX). Numerous valid and reliable neuropsychological tests are available to measure the various domains of cognitive function. Purpose: However, information regarding the sensitivity and specificity of neuropsychological tests to detect changes in cognitive function from CTX is lacking. The purposes of this meta-analysis were to identify which neuropsychological tests were used to evaluated CTX-induced impairment in various domains of cognitive function in adult cancer patients and to determine the sensitivity of each of the neuropsychological tests, that were used in at least two studies, through an estimation of an effect size. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Lezak’s conceptual framework for neuropsychological testing formed the theoretical basis for this study. Methods: Abstracts from five computerized databases were reviewed to identify studies that included 1) original data; 2) an adult sample; 3) neuropsychological testing of cancer patients who had or were currently receiving CTX; 4) valid and reliable neuropsychological tests with published standardized administration procedures; and 5) sufficient information reported on at least one test of cognitive function, to allow for the estimation of an effect size. Data Analysis: Prior to determining an effect size, each neuropsychological test was assigned to a specific domain of cognitive function. Johnson’s (1993) DSTAT 1.10 meta-analysis software was used to calculate the effect size and confidence intervals. Effect sizes were interpreted as negligible if less than 0.20, small if between 0.20 and 0.50, medium if between 0.50 and 0.80, and large if greater than 0.80. A significance level of 0.05 was inferred when the 95% confidence interval did not cross zero. Findings and Implications: This study found sensitive neuropsychological tests for the cognitive domains of language, motor function, verbal memory, and visual memory, but not for attention/concentration, executive function, information processing speed, or visuospatial skill. While this meta-analysis provides initial data on the sensitivity of some neuropsychological tests to determine CTX-induced changes in cognitive function, the limited number of studies makes it difficult to draw any definite conclusions. These results suggest the need for carefully designed, longitudinal studies to evaluate CTX-induced impairments in cognitive function.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Meta-Analysis of the Sensitivity of Various Neuropsychological Tests Used to Detect Chemotherapy-Induced Impairments in Cognitive Functionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJansen, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiaskowski, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDodd, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDowling, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKramer, J.en_US
dc.author.detailsC. Jansen, Kaiser Permanente, San Francisco, California, USA; C. Miaskowski; M. Dodd; G. Dowling; J. Krameren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165338-
dc.description.abstractImpairment in cognitive function is a newly recognized side effect of chemotherapy (CTX). Numerous valid and reliable neuropsychological tests are available to measure the various domains of cognitive function. Purpose: However, information regarding the sensitivity and specificity of neuropsychological tests to detect changes in cognitive function from CTX is lacking. The purposes of this meta-analysis were to identify which neuropsychological tests were used to evaluated CTX-induced impairment in various domains of cognitive function in adult cancer patients and to determine the sensitivity of each of the neuropsychological tests, that were used in at least two studies, through an estimation of an effect size. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Lezak’s conceptual framework for neuropsychological testing formed the theoretical basis for this study. Methods: Abstracts from five computerized databases were reviewed to identify studies that included 1) original data; 2) an adult sample; 3) neuropsychological testing of cancer patients who had or were currently receiving CTX; 4) valid and reliable neuropsychological tests with published standardized administration procedures; and 5) sufficient information reported on at least one test of cognitive function, to allow for the estimation of an effect size. Data Analysis: Prior to determining an effect size, each neuropsychological test was assigned to a specific domain of cognitive function. Johnson’s (1993) DSTAT 1.10 meta-analysis software was used to calculate the effect size and confidence intervals. Effect sizes were interpreted as negligible if less than 0.20, small if between 0.20 and 0.50, medium if between 0.50 and 0.80, and large if greater than 0.80. A significance level of 0.05 was inferred when the 95% confidence interval did not cross zero. Findings and Implications: This study found sensitive neuropsychological tests for the cognitive domains of language, motor function, verbal memory, and visual memory, but not for attention/concentration, executive function, information processing speed, or visuospatial skill. While this meta-analysis provides initial data on the sensitivity of some neuropsychological tests to determine CTX-induced changes in cognitive function, the limited number of studies makes it difficult to draw any definite conclusions. These results suggest the need for carefully designed, longitudinal studies to evaluate CTX-induced impairments in cognitive function.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:45Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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