2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165339
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Do Nurse Case Managers Care for Older Women With Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Jennings-Sanders, A.; Kuo, J. F.; Anderson, E.; Freeman, J.; Goodwin, J.
Author Details:
A. Jennings-Sanders, Cleveland State University, School of Nursing, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; J. F. Kuo; E. Anderson; J. Freeman; J. Goodwin
Abstract:
Older women's illness experience of breast cancer may differ substantially from younger women's in their personal reactions to, and needs resulting from, the diagnosis. Oncology nurse case managers can manage an episode of illness for this population. Purpose: Older women with breast cancer are faced with a multitude of physical and psychosocial problems associated with breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to describe how nurse case managers care for older women with breast cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The Nurse Case Management Model for Older Breast Cancer Patients served as the conceptual framework for this study. This model incorporates both the structure of nurse case management and the processes by which this structure addresses the entire care continuum. Methods: This was a randomized prospective trial study. Older women (ages 60-89) newly diagnosed with breast cancer being cared for by 60 surgeons were recruited for this study. A total of 335 women (166 in the control group and 169 in the intervention nurse case management group) were included in the study. The nurses implemented multiple nursing interventions in each nursing process phase over a period of 12 months. Data Analysis: The mean number of contacts over 12 months for each type of nursing intervention on the nurse case manager checklist was illustrated. T-tests and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used to estimate the difference in the number of nurse case management contacts by selected characteristics. Multiple regression models were developed to assess which characteristics (i.e., age, education, income, race, lives alone, needs assistance with ADL's, stage of cancer, attending a support group, CES-D, and MMSE) were associated with the number of nurse case management contacts in each of the nursing phases. Findings and Implications: In each nursing phase, there were a greater number of nurse case management contacts in the first quarter. Bivariate analysis illustrated statistical differences between the following client characteristics with respect to mean amount of nurse case management: race, income, education, and living alone. Multivariate analysis revealed that the following client characteristics predicted nurse case management contact: age, income, living alone, and stage of cancer. Based on the findings of this study, oncology nurse case managers can develop specific nursing interventions to meet the needs of older women with breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Do Nurse Case Managers Care for Older Women With Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorJennings-Sanders, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKuo, J. F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGoodwin, J.en_US
dc.author.detailsA. Jennings-Sanders, Cleveland State University, School of Nursing, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; J. F. Kuo; E. Anderson; J. Freeman; J. Goodwinen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165339-
dc.description.abstractOlder women's illness experience of breast cancer may differ substantially from younger women's in their personal reactions to, and needs resulting from, the diagnosis. Oncology nurse case managers can manage an episode of illness for this population. Purpose: Older women with breast cancer are faced with a multitude of physical and psychosocial problems associated with breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to describe how nurse case managers care for older women with breast cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The Nurse Case Management Model for Older Breast Cancer Patients served as the conceptual framework for this study. This model incorporates both the structure of nurse case management and the processes by which this structure addresses the entire care continuum. Methods: This was a randomized prospective trial study. Older women (ages 60-89) newly diagnosed with breast cancer being cared for by 60 surgeons were recruited for this study. A total of 335 women (166 in the control group and 169 in the intervention nurse case management group) were included in the study. The nurses implemented multiple nursing interventions in each nursing process phase over a period of 12 months. Data Analysis: The mean number of contacts over 12 months for each type of nursing intervention on the nurse case manager checklist was illustrated. T-tests and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used to estimate the difference in the number of nurse case management contacts by selected characteristics. Multiple regression models were developed to assess which characteristics (i.e., age, education, income, race, lives alone, needs assistance with ADL's, stage of cancer, attending a support group, CES-D, and MMSE) were associated with the number of nurse case management contacts in each of the nursing phases. Findings and Implications: In each nursing phase, there were a greater number of nurse case management contacts in the first quarter. Bivariate analysis illustrated statistical differences between the following client characteristics with respect to mean amount of nurse case management: race, income, education, and living alone. Multivariate analysis revealed that the following client characteristics predicted nurse case management contact: age, income, living alone, and stage of cancer. Based on the findings of this study, oncology nurse case managers can develop specific nursing interventions to meet the needs of older women with breast cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:46Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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