2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165340
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment Challenges for Lung Cancer Nursing Research
Author(s):
John, L.
Author Details:
L. John, The University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA
Abstract:
Lung cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosis in men and women. Quality of life and fatigue are significant problems in this population. Nursing research is uniquely qualified to address these issues; however, recruitment of participants to nursing studies presents a daunting challenge. In the current HIPPA environment in which researcher contact with patients (potential participants) is severely limited, the challenges for recruitment are amplified. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine challenges to recruitment of lung cancer patients into a seated exercise study focusing on promoting quality of life and decreasing fatigue. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Roy’s Adaptation model is used to guide this study. Methods: Persons diagnosed with primary lung cancer beginning treatment were recruited from local community oncology clinics. Recruitment strategies included: flyers placed in waiting rooms and posted in exam areas, presentations to clinic nurses, social workers, financial counselors, and physicians, announcements in professional oncology nursing meetings, advertisements in local oncology nursing newsletters, and announcements in support groups by group facilitators. Data Analysis: Effectiveness of recruitment strategies was evaluated based on number of participants recruited by each strategy and by narrative descriptions given by participants regarding the acceptability of each strategy. Findings and Implications: The most effective recruitment strategy identified by participants was a flyer delivered to them by their nurses, and the second most effective strategy was flyers delivered by the financial counselors. Participants stated that they were reluctant to be publicly identified as lung cancer patients. They suggested that potential participants might be less receptive to picking up flyers advertising lung cancer studies placed in public areas. It was more acceptable to receive the flyer from their oncology nurse, social worker, or financial counselor. Given the impact fatigue has on quality of life in lung cancer patients and the difficulties with recruitment, researchers will need to be even more creative in discovering new and acceptable ways to reach this often overlooked population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment Challenges for Lung Cancer Nursing Researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohn, L.en_US
dc.author.detailsL. John, The University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165340-
dc.description.abstractLung cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosis in men and women. Quality of life and fatigue are significant problems in this population. Nursing research is uniquely qualified to address these issues; however, recruitment of participants to nursing studies presents a daunting challenge. In the current HIPPA environment in which researcher contact with patients (potential participants) is severely limited, the challenges for recruitment are amplified. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine challenges to recruitment of lung cancer patients into a seated exercise study focusing on promoting quality of life and decreasing fatigue. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Roy’s Adaptation model is used to guide this study. Methods: Persons diagnosed with primary lung cancer beginning treatment were recruited from local community oncology clinics. Recruitment strategies included: flyers placed in waiting rooms and posted in exam areas, presentations to clinic nurses, social workers, financial counselors, and physicians, announcements in professional oncology nursing meetings, advertisements in local oncology nursing newsletters, and announcements in support groups by group facilitators. Data Analysis: Effectiveness of recruitment strategies was evaluated based on number of participants recruited by each strategy and by narrative descriptions given by participants regarding the acceptability of each strategy. Findings and Implications: The most effective recruitment strategy identified by participants was a flyer delivered to them by their nurses, and the second most effective strategy was flyers delivered by the financial counselors. Participants stated that they were reluctant to be publicly identified as lung cancer patients. They suggested that potential participants might be less receptive to picking up flyers advertising lung cancer studies placed in public areas. It was more acceptable to receive the flyer from their oncology nurse, social worker, or financial counselor. Given the impact fatigue has on quality of life in lung cancer patients and the difficulties with recruitment, researchers will need to be even more creative in discovering new and acceptable ways to reach this often overlooked population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:47Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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