2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165347
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding Delay in Breast Cancer Diagnosis in Diverse Young Women
Author(s):
Manly-Lampkin, S.; Waters, C.; Dodd, M.; Rankin, S.; Bloom, J.
Author Details:
S. Manly-Lampkin, All Health Care, Oakland, California, USA; C. Waters; M. Dodd; S. Rankin; J. Bloom
Abstract:
Public and professional awareness about breast cancer is increasing because of educational campaigns that target women and health care professionals in diverse settings. Often, however, practitioners fail to validate self-identified breast cancer symptoms discovered by women, especially women under 40 years old. Therefore, a diagnosis of breast cancer is often delayed, and when it is finally diagnosed, it is late stage diagnosis. Purpose: Breast cancer in young women occur less often, but delays in breast cancer occur more often. The purposes of this study were to investigate delay in breast cancer diagnosis and describe the breast cancer illness experience of women 40 years old and younger. The specific aims: Describe young women's self-discovery of breast symptoms; describe their health-seeking path to breast cancer diagnosis. Determine if they experience delay; examine ways in which the initial breast cancer diagnosis influence subsequent breast health behavior; explore provider-patient relationships; and determine if delay in breast cancer diagnosis differs across race/ethnicity. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The study was grounded in human development, social behavior, and symbolic interactionism frameworks. Methods: A descriptive, qualitative design was used. Face to face interviews using a Semi-structured guide was used to interview 30 ethnically diverse women 40 years of age and under diagnosed with breast cancer living in the San Francisco Bay Area Data Analysis: The women's interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using the narrative technique. Findings and Implications: Findings revealed most young women discovered their breast symptom, as breast pain, they did not delay seeking medical attention; the breast cancer diagnostic pathways were inconsistent; the impact of a delayed diagnosis on subsequent breast health behavior varied; and the interval of delay lasted up to 5 years. Breast cancer diagnostic delays appear to be related to age, pregnancy, family history of cancer, negative patient-provider relationship, pain, and misinterpretation of a breast symptom as normal. Conclusions of the study were breast symptoms for young women tend to be atypical; there is possibly a link between breast cancer delay and having a child; having a positive patient-provider relationship is important to early diagnosis and treatment. African American women were diagnosed younger, experienced longer delay, and were diagnosed at a late stage, even though a majority of them sought early attention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding Delay in Breast Cancer Diagnosis in Diverse Young Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorManly-Lampkin, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWaters, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDodd, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRankin, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBloom, J.en_US
dc.author.detailsS. Manly-Lampkin, All Health Care, Oakland, California, USA; C. Waters; M. Dodd; S. Rankin; J. Bloomen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165347-
dc.description.abstractPublic and professional awareness about breast cancer is increasing because of educational campaigns that target women and health care professionals in diverse settings. Often, however, practitioners fail to validate self-identified breast cancer symptoms discovered by women, especially women under 40 years old. Therefore, a diagnosis of breast cancer is often delayed, and when it is finally diagnosed, it is late stage diagnosis. Purpose: Breast cancer in young women occur less often, but delays in breast cancer occur more often. The purposes of this study were to investigate delay in breast cancer diagnosis and describe the breast cancer illness experience of women 40 years old and younger. The specific aims: Describe young women's self-discovery of breast symptoms; describe their health-seeking path to breast cancer diagnosis. Determine if they experience delay; examine ways in which the initial breast cancer diagnosis influence subsequent breast health behavior; explore provider-patient relationships; and determine if delay in breast cancer diagnosis differs across race/ethnicity. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The study was grounded in human development, social behavior, and symbolic interactionism frameworks. Methods: A descriptive, qualitative design was used. Face to face interviews using a Semi-structured guide was used to interview 30 ethnically diverse women 40 years of age and under diagnosed with breast cancer living in the San Francisco Bay Area Data Analysis: The women's interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using the narrative technique. Findings and Implications: Findings revealed most young women discovered their breast symptom, as breast pain, they did not delay seeking medical attention; the breast cancer diagnostic pathways were inconsistent; the impact of a delayed diagnosis on subsequent breast health behavior varied; and the interval of delay lasted up to 5 years. Breast cancer diagnostic delays appear to be related to age, pregnancy, family history of cancer, negative patient-provider relationship, pain, and misinterpretation of a breast symptom as normal. Conclusions of the study were breast symptoms for young women tend to be atypical; there is possibly a link between breast cancer delay and having a child; having a positive patient-provider relationship is important to early diagnosis and treatment. African American women were diagnosed younger, experienced longer delay, and were diagnosed at a late stage, even though a majority of them sought early attention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:55Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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