Patients Experiences of Receiving Radiation Treatment for Head & Neck Cancer: A Qualitative Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165350
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patients Experiences of Receiving Radiation Treatment for Head & Neck Cancer: A Qualitative Study
Author(s):
McQuestion, M.
Author Details:
M. McQuestion, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Abstract:
Clinical experience reinforces that the diagnosis and treatment of a head and neck cancer has a major impact on patients. As a result of changes in radiation treatment protocols, increased use of combined modality treatments, and an increased emphasis on ambulatory care, the experience of care and treatment has changed for patients. The existence or lack of social support, financial support and effectiveness of symptom management can also have a significant impact. Nurses are in a unique position to support patients during this experience. Purpose: Most research in head and neck cancer has focused on the efficacy of treatment modalities and the assessment and management of side effects. Little attention has been directed toward understanding patients’ experience of receiving radiation treatment. This qualitative study helps describe and understand the experience of patients from their perspective. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Thorne’s (1997) approach of interpretive description was used for the study. Thorne supports a method of interpretive non-categorical description derived from nursing’s philosophical and theoretical foundations. This qualitative approach is grounded in an interpretive orientation and acknowledges, “human health and illness experiences are comprised of complex interactions between psychosocial and biological phenomena” (Thorne, 1997, p 172). Methods: Theoretical sample selection was used to recruit participants from a specialized cancer clinic. In-depth, audiotaped interviews were conducted with 17 participants, 3-4 months following treatment. A single post analysis focus group was held with 5 participants to share findings and verify that themes were reflective of the experience of the participants. Data Analysis: Giorgi's analytical technique was used for analysis. Findings and Implications: Five themes were identified including participants 1) experienced shock, worry, and a fear of dying as they attempted to make sense of their diagnosis, 2) felt a lack of control from disrupted expectations and changes in life routines, 3) had a heightened awareness of self, others and the health care system, 4) used multiple strategies to regain a sense of control, and 5) learning to live with an uncertain future. Strategies and interventions are being developed for patients as well as the health care team to better support future patients for the treatment experience.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatients Experiences of Receiving Radiation Treatment for Head & Neck Cancer: A Qualitative Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcQuestion, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. McQuestion, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canadaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165350-
dc.description.abstractClinical experience reinforces that the diagnosis and treatment of a head and neck cancer has a major impact on patients. As a result of changes in radiation treatment protocols, increased use of combined modality treatments, and an increased emphasis on ambulatory care, the experience of care and treatment has changed for patients. The existence or lack of social support, financial support and effectiveness of symptom management can also have a significant impact. Nurses are in a unique position to support patients during this experience. Purpose: Most research in head and neck cancer has focused on the efficacy of treatment modalities and the assessment and management of side effects. Little attention has been directed toward understanding patients’ experience of receiving radiation treatment. This qualitative study helps describe and understand the experience of patients from their perspective. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Thorne’s (1997) approach of interpretive description was used for the study. Thorne supports a method of interpretive non-categorical description derived from nursing’s philosophical and theoretical foundations. This qualitative approach is grounded in an interpretive orientation and acknowledges, “human health and illness experiences are comprised of complex interactions between psychosocial and biological phenomena” (Thorne, 1997, p 172). Methods: Theoretical sample selection was used to recruit participants from a specialized cancer clinic. In-depth, audiotaped interviews were conducted with 17 participants, 3-4 months following treatment. A single post analysis focus group was held with 5 participants to share findings and verify that themes were reflective of the experience of the participants. Data Analysis: Giorgi's analytical technique was used for analysis. Findings and Implications: Five themes were identified including participants 1) experienced shock, worry, and a fear of dying as they attempted to make sense of their diagnosis, 2) felt a lack of control from disrupted expectations and changes in life routines, 3) had a heightened awareness of self, others and the health care system, 4) used multiple strategies to regain a sense of control, and 5) learning to live with an uncertain future. Strategies and interventions are being developed for patients as well as the health care team to better support future patients for the treatment experience.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:16:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:16:58Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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